Tag Archives: Amanda Bregel

N.C. Gerrymandering No Laughing Matter

Rep. Destin Hall’s vigorous defense of Republican gerrymandering causes stunned laughter from audience at NAACP forum in Lenoir

LENOIR, N.C. – Destin Hall, Caldwell County’s representative in the North Carolina General Assembly, was greeted with stunning, uproarious laughter from the audience at the NAACP candidate forum on Oct. 6 when he vigorously defended the Republican legislature’s gerrymandering of North Carolina’s congressional and state legislative districts.

Despite repeated court rulings that the gerrymandering is unconstitutional, Hall said otherwise. Fortunately, his remarks were recorded on video, which you can see here.

And I can tell you that the way the maps are drawn now are much, much, much more fair than they ever were.” – Destin Hall

He was asked by an audience member, “What would you do to fix the gerrymandering problem in this state?”

Hall responds, “So in my opinion, partisan redistricting is what the Constitution calls for.”

NC Nothing comparesHe then continues speaking, making unsupported claims of gerrymandering being historically constitutional, and essentially arguing that those opposing the GOP’s efforts in Raleigh are sore losers.

He also proudly states, “This is actually a topic I know something about.”

That’s because he, no doubt, like every Republican member of the General Assembly, saw no problem with drawing maps to exclude minorities and members of the opposition party. Hall’s comments that gerrymandering is legal is laughable, as you will obviously see in the video. More chilling though, is that Hall did what the GOP is becoming expert at. Telling the big lie.

He concluded his remarks by saying, “And I can tell you that the way the maps are drawn now are much, much, much more fair than they ever were.”

The audience wasn’t buying it, as they responded with uproarious, spontaneous laughter.

Unfortunately, it’s no laughing matter, but one can understand why the audience laughed in his face; it’s better than crying. Ironically, he smiles in response, either clueless or arrogant. The latter wouldn’t be surprising, as shortly after Republicans took control of the N.C. General Assembly in 2011, courts ruled they gerrymandered districts along racial lines. Then, earlier this year, by their own admission, Republicans were again found to have gerrymandered districts unconstitutionally, this time along party lines. Indeed, if you will look up the phrase North Carolina unconstitutional gerrymandering on the Internet, you will discover at least 86 articles written about these and other cases since the 2010 takeover of the North Carolina General Assembly by Republicans, including this one that ranks our state just above Cuba as a “deeply flawed democracy.”

NC State MottoThis can be reversed though. Early voting begins next Wednesday, Oct. 17. It is time for our state’s leaders to live by its motto – “To be, rather than to seem.” The Republican Party in North Carolina clearly doesn’t believe that.

I think our people do though. If you agree, you might want to take a look at Hall’s challenger, teacher Amanda Bregel.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018

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Amanda Bregel Looks to Represent Caldwell County in NCGA

Fourth generation teacher motivated by concern for students and families, enjoys strong volunteer support

LENOIR, N.C.Amanda Bregel, a teacher of English and Caldwell County Studies for sophomores at the CCC&TI Early College High School, is looking to unseat Destin Hall in the North Carolina General Assembly (NCGA). Hall represents House District 87, which includes all of Caldwell County.

Amanda BregelBregel, a Democrat and quick learner supported by an enthusiastic group of volunteers, is undaunted by the task of trying to unseat a Republican incumbent in Caldwell County, where the GOP enjoys a significant voter registration margin. Referring to questions about her experience to challenge Hall and serve if elected, her answer could be that of any teacher: Anybody that can successfully manage a classroom of 20 students, work a 12-hour day and have a 10-minute lunch break can handle just about anything. Indeed, Bregel has proven she does indeed manage a classroom well, for she has been Teacher of the Year and earned a Teacher’s Fellowship.

Her mother, grandmother and great-grandmother were all teachers. In fact, her great-grandmother taught in a one-room school house. She emphasizes the importance of being a lifelong learner, so it’s not surprising that she had many thoughtful insights when I sat down with her earlier this week for the following interview.

Q: Why have you decided to seek this office?

A: I am running to stand up for my students and families because I spend everyday to help the children in our county. My fellow teachers and I do what we can to provide for the children with so little. I realized I could help them not only in my classroom, but also another way – by influencing the laws that impact our students. I have the knowledge about our needs and want to have influence on the state budget, as 50 percent of the state’s budget goes to education and 65 percent of the budget for Caldwell County Schools comes from the state.

I think a teacher’s perspective is needed on the floor of the House. Right now, they can just look out the windows at teachers as they did earlier this year. With teachers in office, they will have to listen to people with experience in the classroom.

Q: If elected, what would be your legislative priorities?

A: People. I am focused on supporting people, so I’m focused on education, healthcare, and rural support. We must also ensure that we have a transparent state government.

I would vote to expand Medicaid to help with the opioid crisis and address many of the health issues, such as cancer rates. To me supporting the rural community means paying attention to NCDOT decisions early and speaking up when laws favor big business. This means supporting environmental protections since so much of our county is rural, natural beauty.

Q: What would be your priorities for public schools, community colleges and our universities?

A: I will pay attention to their legislative priorities. I know the legislative priorities of CCC&TI and Caldwell County Schools (workforce development and teaching assistants, calendar autonomy, and money owed from the state). I support Governor Cooper’s initiative to make North Carolina a Top Ten Educated State by 2025 – emphasizing early childhood education, increasing enrollment in pre-kindergarten, improving our high school graduation rate and increasing the percentage of adults with a higher education degree. Although I work at the Early College High School, I do not believe all high school students in Caldwell County need to be enrolled at a four-year university after high school. We need to give teachers the breathing space to create relationships with students-at all levels so they can get to know children and help students figure out their strengths and possible career path. Apprenticeship programs are something so many businesses in this area are interested in, so why aren’t we developing these programs?

I think a teacher’s perspective is needed on the floor of the House. Right now, they can just look out the windows at teachers as they did earlier this year. With teachers in office, they will have to listen to people with experience in the classroom.

Q: Do you support term limits for legislators?

A: No. Term limits can be seen as a way to limit the people’s vote. The people aren’t choosing their representative if he or she is being forced to retire. What I really believe that legislators who have been in office should be doing is “building a bench” as they say or finding and strengthening the next generation of leaders instead of staying in office for so long. You don’t want all of your experience leaving office and leaving only the lobbyists, full of knowledge about their cause and no cap on their number of years in the job, ready to influence new politicians. I do support more voter education and new legislation on campaign finance and transparency.

Q: If you were to give a “The State of North Carolina” speech, what would you say?

A: The North Carolina Constitution directs the governor come to the legislature to “give to the General Assembly information of the affairs of the State and recommend to their considerations such measures as he shall deem expedient.” Right now, what would be really expedient is to support the people. We can only really support the people by working together. North Carolina is represented equally by both political sides. We should be a beacon of bi-partisanship. We must praise examples of bi-partisanship, reach out and stop blaming each other’s parties.

Q: What is your vision for Caldwell County and North Carolina?

A: My vision for Caldwell County is a place where we can preserve our heritage and natural beauty while also providing people with the tools and support they need to thrive. I want us to keep growing and improving. I tell my students that Caldwell County is a special place because there are so many people here working so diligently to improve daily life. My vision is a county where these hard-working visionaries have the tools they need from the state and county to complete their projects and we can foster partnerships to benefit the people.

Q: There is no denying that the furniture industry was the primary driving force in Caldwell County’s economic development during the 20th Century. However, it also created a mono-economy that essentially caused great distress to the county in the 1990s because of NAFTA and other trade agreements passed by Congress. What can you do in the North Carolina General Assembly do to insulate communities throughout our state from this happening again?

A: This ties into the education question because we need to emphasize a diverse education and completing a program that trains you for a job in our area. We must adopt Skills-Based approach to fulfilling workplace needs. There are jobs available here, but can we house people so they live in Caldwell and invest here? Can we train them to fill those jobs and be able to provide for their families? We can if we keep using incentives from the state to bring in businesses like the building reuse program, which has been used in over 30 projects since 2006 and the OneNC Fund from the North Carolina Department of Commerce.

Q: From its inception, when Lenoir was known as Tucker’s Barn, music has been an important part of the city’s culture and growth. Doc Watson was heavily influential in the city, and the city and county has and continues to produce hundreds of musicians (as demonstrated by the success of the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase and Happy Valley Old-Time Fiddler’s Convention). Are you committed to champion and fund the arts community in the NCGA? How?

The creative industry contributes to North Carolina beyond our economy. Value creativity is essential to our quality of life, appreciation of our heritage, and pride in our community identity. The arts, history, and libraries are integral to our strong education programs and unique sense of place. So, I will strongly support the North Carolina Arts Council.

A: Yes. Arts in schools is a big need. We must protest when cuts to arts come up. We need to recognize the impact the arts have on our state’s economy. The creative industry contributes to North Carolina beyond our economy. Value creativity is essential to our quality of life, appreciation of our heritage, and pride in our community identity. The arts, history, and libraries are integral to our strong education programs and unique sense of place. So, I will strongly support the North Carolina Arts Council.

Q: About 20 years ago, the EDC brought in local consultants to help the county after the furniture industry abandoned it. One of the key points these outsiders identified was the appearance of the county, in particularly abandoned buildings. Yet still today, there are dozens of large abandoned factories and other businesses. It would seem this problem has been kicked down the road during that time. What can you do in the NCGA do to mitigate the effect of so many shuttered and dilapidated buildings and businesses?

A: A lot of our vacant buildings are superfund sites, so I support economic cleanup and environmental protections. They are dangerous and are health, safety and environmental concerns. I am proud that the City of Lenoir is working to get grants to clean up superfund sites. Still, vacant buildings are a concern, especially since it costs so much for a city to demolish a site and that’s taxpayer money for a site owned by a business or person. I’ve learned it costs about $10,000 just to demolish a vacant home.

As a member of the NCGA I would vote to re-fund the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality and reinstate regulations that were rolled back the last few years. We can follow the lead of towns in other states that are using grants from environmental groups to knock down vacant houses. We can also capitalize on technology to find abandoned buildings and owners. We must make businesses responsible for the messes they make so that 50 years down the road the next generation isn’t dealing with the problems we are creating today like we are.

I tell my students that Caldwell County is a special place because there are so many people here working so diligently to improve daily life.

Q: Western North Carolina continues to grow as a tourist destination. What can you do in the NCGA do to ensure that it is a community that not only benefits from this growth, but helps facilitate it?

A: We should not always indulge the tourism industry right away. They don’t always have the best intentions for small towns like ours at heart. I will do all I can to make sure projects like the 321 superstreet doesn’t leave Caldwell behind. Becoming more involved with the NCDOT however I can is going to be a big priority. Communities know their needs, so as the representative I should vote for ours, not along party lines. Protecting our environment also helps with Western North Carolina tourism.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like voters to know that I have not asked?

A: Yes. I know as a teacher you never know what your day is going to bring. I’m not used to having a lunch break. I work every moment of my day for other people. Teachers work a 12-hour day. I will work!

Also, as a teacher I am a constant learner. You can only be a good teacher if you are constantly learning. The same is true with our state representative.

Amanda for NC House jpgWant to know more? Visit:

amandafornchouse.org
facebook.com/abregel

 © Michael M. Barrick, 2018