Tag Archives: Lindsay Barrick

Lindsay Barrick to Lead Caldwell Arts Council

Longtime Caldwell resident that benefited from the Council as a student is named Executive Director

Lindsay Barrick

Lindsay Barrick

LENOIR, N.C. – The Caldwell Arts Council (CAC) is pleased to announce that Lindsay Barrick will become its sixth Executive Director, effective April 29. During her time as the CAC Social Media Manager, Barrick has overseen the creation and dissemination of content on various social networking platforms. She has been a long-time advocate and supporter of the CAC, other arts venues, and many individual artists, musicians, writers, and thespians.

She currently serves as Director of Programs and New Media for St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Hickory as well as studio manager and printmaking instructor at the Hickory Museum of Art. A native of West Virginia, she spent most of her formative years in Caldwell County. Barrick is passionate about the arts and the people of Appalachia.

She said, “I am honored and thrilled to serve an organization I have loved since I was a young girl. It will be my great joy to continue the important work of Caldwell Arts Council: introducing school children to live theatre through our Artists in Schools program; preserving traditional Appalachian music through JAM; encouraging participation in poetry and acting through our annual competitions; supporting non-profits and individual artists in their vital efforts through grants; and presenting opportunities for artists and musicians to share in the thrill of exhibiting their craft.”

Barrick continued, “I also look forward to developing new ways to connect our community members and the arts. I have tremendous respect for former Executive Director Lee Carol Giduz and current Executive Director Adrienne Roellgen. I know much can be learned from their leadership.” She also praised the current staff, volunteers and board, adding, “Launi, Cathy, Bob, our dedicated volunteers, generous board members, and I already work so well together. I’m excited about the possibilities going forward.”

Barrick said, “Adrienne will continue to serve as Executive Director through April 28. We appreciate her enduring enthusiasm and love for Caldwell Arts Council. We wish her and her family the very best as they begin an exciting new chapter in Los Angeles.”

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017.

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Unity the Theme at ‘Preserving Sacred Appalachia’ Conference

Interdisciplinary and interfaith gathering helps strengthen collaboration on environmental issues

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Approximately 40 ecological preservationists joined together in Charleston at the St. John’s XXIII Pastoral Center from April 19-21 to champion responsible environmental stewardship in the context of understanding that Appalachia – and all the earth – is sacred. Among those at the “Preserving Sacred Appalachia” conference were people of faith, activists, artists, scientists, politicians, and educators.

Ben Townsend, a West Virginia native and traditional Appalachian musician, teaches at the conference. Photo by Keely Kernan

Ben Townsend, a West Virginia native and traditional Appalachian musician, teaches at the conference.
Photo by Keely Kernan

The unprecedented interfaith and interdisciplinary gathering was sponsored by St. Luke’s United Methodist Church of Hickory, N.C. In-state partners included the Sierra Club – West Virginia chapter and West Virginia Interfaith Power & Light (WVIPL). The Appalachian Preservation Project handled public relations, planning and logistics for the conference.

It was an intentional interdisciplinary and interfaith outreach by and to people that are devoted to preserving the eco-systems which support life in Appalachia. It brought together the region’s rich collection of seasoned, experienced preservationists. While several organizations provided speakers, the event also included numerous attendees from West Virginia and other Appalachian states determined to identify fundamental areas of agreement regarding the immediate core challenges to Appalachia’s eco-systems and key strategies for addressing them.

Bob Henry Baber, an Appalachian poet, writer and educator, speaks at the conference. Photo by Keely Kernan

Bob Henry Baber, an Appalachian poet, writer and educator, speaks at the conference.
Photo by Keely Kernan

The gathering concluded with a roundtable discussion of the topics discussed over the course of the conference. From those discussions, participants will issue a white paper – scheduled for release this summer. The white paper will be a unified, decisive statement identifying the core challenges threatening the people and environment of Appalachia; explaining what makes Appalachia – and all the earth – sacred; and to equip the people of Appalachia with practical, effective methods to help preserve the region’s water, air, soil, habitats and natural beauty.

The keynote speaker was Tierra Curry, the senior scientist and a conservation biologist at the Center for Biological Diversity. The conference kicked off with an extended trailer of the feature film, “In the Hills and Hollows,” a documentary by Keely Kernan, an award winning freelance photographer and videographer. The documentary, which Kernan is presently filming, investigates the boom and bust impacts that mono-economies based on fossil fuel extraction have on people and their local communities.

Tierra Curry with the Center for Biological Diversity discusses the impact of climate change upon Appalachia. Photo by Keely Kernan

Tierra Curry with the Center for Biological Diversity discusses the impact of climate change upon Appalachia.
Photo by Keely Kernan

Other speakers included Susan Hedge with the Catholic Committee of Appalachia; Bill Price, the organizing representative for the Sierra Club – West Virginia Chapter; Allen Johnson of Christians For The Mountains; Angie Rosser, the executive director of the West Virginia Rivers Coalition; Ben Townsend, a West Virginia traditional musician; Carey Jo Grace and Tuesday Taylor with Our Children, Our Future; Robin Blakeman, the Special Event and Membership Committee Organizer for the Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition; Mike Manypenny, a former member of the West Virginia House of Delegates; Bill Hughes, the West Virginia Community Liaison for the FracTracker Alliance; Bob Henry Baber, a widely published Appalachian poet, novelist, creative writing teacher and mosaic artist; Barbara Ann Volk, a Lewis County landowner; Liz Wiles, the chair of the Sierra Club – West Virginia chapter, as well as Aurora Lights and the Mountain SOL school; Lindsay Barrick, an artist and the Director of Programs at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church; Mel Hoover and Rose Edington with WVIPL; Autumn Bryson, an environmental scientist; Michael Barrick, the founder of the Appalachian Preservation Project and publisher of the Appalachian Chronicle; and, all of the conference attendees.

Topics addressed include Appalachia’s sacredness, climate change, water quality, the role of art and music in telling Appalachia’ story, mountaintop removal, fracking, natural gas pipeline development, child health, politics and policy. It also included times of meditation, reflection and sharing.

Bill Hughes with FracTracker Alliance teaches about the harms associated with fracking. Photo by Keely Kernan

Bill Hughes with FracTracker Alliance teaches about the harms associated with fracking.
Photo by Keely Kernan

As the conference completed, several presenters commented on its value. Wiles shared, “The Preserving Sacred Appalachia conference was a great opportunity to re-connect with familiar faces in West Virginia’s environmental movement as well as meeting members of the faith community who are working on environmental issues in their congregations. This was a good step in bringing together all kinds of communities who care about the health of their families, their neighbors, and their local, natural environment.”

Manypenny said, “I found it very inspiring that so many came out to participate in this event, both as speakers and as advocates, in the ongoing struggle for environmental justice, our Appalachian way of life, and for our love and appreciation of nature.” Barbara Volk echoed his remarks, adding, “I found myself so inspired by the diverse group of people that are ready to shift the paradigm regarding how we affect change in this culture of waste.”

Tierra Curry (L), Susan Hedge and Allen Johnson lead a discussion on the sacredness of Appalachia. Photo by Keely Kernan

Tierra Curry (L), Susan Hedge and Allen Johnson lead a discussion on the sacredness of Appalachia.
Photo by Keely Kernan

Price added, “I’ve been thinking about how the conference will benefit the work that all of us are doing. I think that the faith community can help to convene spaces where people of various opinions and perspectives can come together to get to know each other, to figure out those common values, and to work together for a better future.” Blakeman said, “The conference was a great opportunity to network with and learn from like-minded individuals.”

Hoover offered, “This partnership demonstrates that we are at a crossroads in the Mountain State. We have always known that we must work together to address the many environmental issues impacting the people and ecology of West Virginia. This conference, by joining together people of faith with scientists, educators, artists and others, sends a clear message that cannot be ignored – we are united in purpose.”

St. John's XXIII Pastoral Center. Photo by Allen Johnson

St. John’s XXIII Pastoral Center.
Photo by Allen Johnson

© Appalachian Preservation Project, LLC, 2015. The Appalachian Chronicle is a publication of the Appalachian Preservation Project. The Appalachian Preservation Project is a social enterprise committed to preserving and protecting Appalachia. If you wish to support our work, please consider becoming a member.

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Art Exhibit to Explore Impact of Mountain Top Removal and Fracking

‘Fractured Sanctuary’ considers destruction to the environment

By Michael M. Barrick

HICKORY, N.C. – Lindsay Barrick’s latest body of work – “Fractured Sanctuary” – is part of her ongoing series dealing with the destruction of the natural world and the people who are called to aid in its reconciliation. The exhibit will hang at the Bethlehem Branch Library in Alexander County, N.C. from August 7 until September 25 as part of the Exhibiting Artist Series. She will also show at the United Arts Council of Catawba County in January 2015.

"Your Hands Can Heal"

“Your Hands Can Heal”

Five years ago, the mixed media artist attended a social justice class at her grandparents’ parish in Bridgeport, W.Va. The topic was mountaintop removal. She revealed, “My life was rocked when I learned of the magnitude of the devastation.” Raised to be an outspoken advocate for environmental justice, she became especially passionate about issues relating to mountaintop removal and hydraulic fracturing.

“Fractured Sanctuary” explores themes of demolition and insatiability, attempting to convey the ugly, dirty side of ‘progress.’ All works are one-of-a-kind artist proofs. A West Virginia native, she lives and creates in western North Carolina. She draws strength and inspiration from the ancient Appalachian hills and continues to work on an ever-expanding series that explores themes of destruction and reconciliation of the natural world.

In “Fractured Sanctuary,” each piece was made using an etching press. Other than producing a block carving Christmas card in 1993, she had never worked in the indirect process. She took her first printmaking class with Thomas Thielemann in the spring of 2014. “Fractured Sanctuary” is the direct result of learning how to create monotypes, intaglio prints, and collagraphs at Caldwell Community College. Most of the work was made on the Hickory Museum of Art’s intaglio press.

Barrick said, “I am thrilled to partner with one of my favorite non-profits – Appalachian Voices – an organization which advocates for cleaner energy sources in Appalachia and the whole of America, particularly shining the light on the costs of mountaintop removal and hydraulic fracturing.” Ten percent of all sales will benefit the important work of Appalachian Voices.

The artist was awarded a Regional Artist Grant by the United Arts Council (2012) and a full scholarship from Windgate Charitable Foundation (2013) to study encaustic painting from renowned artists Celia Gray, Elizabeth Tomasetti, and Fawn Potash at Penland School of Craft. She is in the process of converting an old garage into an encaustic and printing studio.

Lindsay’s small-scale collages, made entirely from found objects and recycled material, were featured in the 2012 two-person show, “Up Close & Far Away.” Her work was selected as part of “Concertina, Interpreted,” an invitational exhibition at Caldwell Arts Council based upon North Carolina Poet Laureate Joseph Bathanti’s latest book of poetry.

Lindsay creates from her Jazz Age home in the Green Park neighborhood of Hickory. She has studied with Jacquelyn Mate, Thomas Thielemann, Lynda Lea Bonkemeyer, Damon Hood, Jean Cauthen, and Mary Dobbin. As facilitator of the Hickory Museum of Art’s Open Studio, she often paints alongside other artists, including Kate Worm, Stephen Brooks, Matthew Good, Clay James, and Joel Kincaid.

Barrick is a founding member of Harmony Arts Collaborative, the co-founder of The Boating Party, and a co-founder of Painting with Peers. She coordinates art projects for a local non-profit and is passionate about promoting and collaborating with other artists, writers, and musicians.

“Fractured Sanctuary” is dedicated to the memory of her paternal grandmother, Minetta Lane “Sparky” Barrick – a life-long advocate for the down-and-outs and underdogs – and to her parents for their constant encouragement and deep love of the mountains. Lindsay’s niece Atleigh, who is already an artist at five, is a huge inspiration. The impetus for the work comes from Lindsay’s deep desire to leave the world more beautiful for Atleigh and those who will follow.

© Michael Barrick/Appalachian Chronicle, 2014.

(Note: Lindsay Barrick is the daughter of Michael Barrick).