Category Archives: Arts & Music

Andrew Massey Living Lenoir’s Legacy

Pickin’ and playing on the porch as old as this Western North Carolina county

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LENOIR, N.C. – Since the first European pioneers explored the Yadkin Valley and settled Tucker’s Barn – our modern day Lenoir – music has been central to our heritage.

Above, my buddy Andrew Massey takes a few minutes to pick on his guitar on his back deck. Constantly writing, he played two new tunes. Pickin’ and singing on your porch is nothing new in Lenoir or anywhere in Caldwell County. It’s a way of life. Musicians thrive off of each other and the heritage is continued!

It’s always a joy to enjoy the creative offerings of Andrew and his many friends. Indeed, he is part of Sycamore Bones, a local band that plays regionally and played an electrifying set in the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase.  (Don’t miss the 20th annual Showcase on March 10. Read about it here).

One thing I concluded for certain from listening to Andrew offer his latest creations on an unseasonably warm and beautifully sunny February afternoon – the arts community truly is the shining light of Lenoir.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018.

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Lenoir Library to Host Writing Workshop

Workshop designed to help adults improve skills and knowledge

By Michael M. Barrick

LENOIR,  N.C.  – The Lenoir branch of the Caldwell County Public Library system will be a hosting a Writing Workshop on six consecutive Saturdays, from February 17 — March 24, 2018 @ 10 a.m in room 5 at the Lenoir Library​.

“There’s nothing like getting together with like-minded writers, encouraging one another and offering good constructive criticism. A bond has been developed between us that will continue long after this class is over!!!” – A participant from the 2017 workshop.

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Photo by Jan Kahánek on Unsplash

I will be conducting the workshop; it will be quite similar to last year’s “Just Write!” Workshop at the library, but has been expanded.

Regardless of your writing skill level, knowledge of the basic rules of grammar, or writing experience, this workshop is student-led, with peer editing teams working together as a “community of writers” helping one another:

  • Improve general writing skills and knowledge;
  • Try or expand work on poetry and fiction;
  • Record the history of their family;
  • Improve technical writing skills;
  • Work towards seeking work as a reporter or freelance writer for magazines and newspapers.

This writing workshop include engaging activities, solid instruction and lots of writing! Most importantly, it creates a bond among the writers. A participant from last year’s workshop said: “There’s nothing like getting together with like-minded writers, encouraging one another and offering good constructive criticism. A bond has been developed between us that will continue long after this class is over!!!”

There is no charge and basic supplies will be provided. Laptop computers and other hand-held devices must be turned off or set on “silent” or “vibrate” during the session. Seating is limited, so reservations are required by February 15. For ages 18 and over. The most important characteristics of workshop attendees is that each person demonstrates evidence of a mind at work, works collaboratively, and is determined to make all six sessions.

You can learn more here.  Call 828-757-1270 or stop by the Lenoir branch of the Caldwell County Library at 120 Hospital Avenue to reserve your slot.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018. 

Still Something in the Water

20th Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase a tribute to its roots

By Michael M. Barrick

LENOIR, N.C. – More than 20 years ago, at a Christmas party at the home of Kay and Patrick Crouch, a typically spontaneous jam session broke out – not unlike the ones that have occurred in homes and on porches in Caldwell County for generations. Present that night was David Briggs, who was then the executive director of the J. E. Broyhill Civic Center.

Recalling that moment recently, Patrick revealed, “He turned to me and said, ‘Patty, why do we not have this on stage?’”

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Strictly Clean and Decent (Kay Crouch, Patrick Crouch, and Ron Shuffler, r) are hosting their 20th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

That simple question led to the first annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase at the Civic Center. The show was titled “It Must Be Something in the Water,” a tip to the long, seemingly unending population of musicians living among the hills and hollows of Caldwell County. Now, the 20th Annual Caldwell County Traditional Musicians Showcase is scheduled for March 10, featuring a few of the musicians from that first Showcase and others since, several new performers, and Briggs making an appearance.

“The Showcase was David’s idea,” shared Patrick. “This is a tribute to the original show. This is a tribute to the longevity of the series. I’ll be delighted to have David on stage. Also, Donna Minton, who has helped so much from the beginning.”

Patrick and Kay are teamed up with Ron Shuffler as Strictly Clean and Decent; they will serve as the host band as they have each year since 1998. Also, Roger Hicks and Lyndy Johnson, who performed in the 2001 Showcase, will have a set. “Roger Hicks and Lyndy Johnson are finger-style guitarists who are listed in the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area roster of traditional musicians,” said Patrick.

Patrick also noted that the artwork from the original Showcase was designed by David Courtner, and also expressed deep gratitude to Jeff Bentley, the current executive director of the Civic Center. Bentley, Patrick pointed out, has been there for every show, having been promoted from sound technician to executive director since Briggs left. “We are on solid ground due to the fact that he works hard to promote the show.”

It (the Showcase) has created a greater awareness of music and the folk arts. Folks have embraced that. It’s not only an American music we embrace. It’s Southern music. It’s Southern Appalachian music.” – Patrick Crouch

Despite having familiar faces this year, Patrick said that the fresh faces are just as exciting to him. “It makes me step back and take a reflective look. We have 12 people who have never been in the Showcase. Over 20 years we’ve had more than 200 musicians, and that is just the tip of the iceberg. We have an unlimited supply of talent. That’s beautiful.”

Patrick sang high praises for Conrad Boudreau who is recognized in the Unifour area as a mandolin teacher of young musicians. “He has come into our community with such energy and enthusiasm that he is influencing and encouraging other musicians.” Joining Boudreau will be Minton, whose popularity is evident by the number of times she has performed in the Showcase – in 1998, 2001, and 2007.

A previous performer, Charlie Carpenter (2005) will be joined by first-timer Todd McCloud. “They are known for their unique and powerful duet vocals,” said Patrick.

A couple typically associated with Lenoir’s furniture industry, Alex and Anne Bernhardt will play Cajun music on their first showcase appearance.

Red Rocking Chair, consisting of Jack Lawrence, Tom Kuhn, and Dale Meyer, who have been playing together 12 years, play Bluegrass music, but other genres as well.

Sarah Seymour and Nick Seymour, both of whom performed in 2010 as part of Sweetbriar Jam, will appear as members of Rooted, an acoustic band that plays Americana and roots music in an acoustic setting. Band members with Rooted making their first showcase appearance are Jimmy Atkins, Drew Gray, Seath Gray, and Morgan Smith.

Audience members will be also treated to the excellence of the Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians and the wit of Nancy Posey, taking her third turn as emcee.

Patrick notes that the Showcase is an important contribution to the rich arts tradition of Caldwell County. “It has created a greater awareness of music and the folk arts,” he said. “Folks have embraced that. It’s not only an American music we embrace. It’s Southern music. It’s Southern Appalachian music.

“It makes us a special place.”

The Showcase will be presented on Saturday, March 10, at 7:30 pm at the J. E. Broyhill Civic Center. Tickets may be purchased in advance at the Civic Center or by calling the box office at 828-726-2401.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018.

Mural Project Highlights Endangered Species

Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel Featured in National Project

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – The Center for Biological Diversity and Dogwood Alliance will host an event on Sunday, June 11 to celebrate the latest installment in the Center’s national endangered species mural project and the final piece in the Gateway Mural series marking the entrance into downtown Asheville below Interstate 240.

The event is scheduled for 3 – 5 p.m. at the underpass where Lexington Avenue crosses under Interstate 240 in downtown Asheville. The underpass is just north of Rosetta’s Kitchen on the Merrimon Ave side of the underpass.

The Carolina northern flying squirrel mural at Merrimon and Lexington avenues will be 90 feet long and 20 feet tall and is being painted this week. The national endangered species mural project highlights imperiled species of special significance to their regions.

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Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel – Credit: USWFS

“The Carolina northern flying squirrel is a beautiful little animal and really represents the forests and mountains of this area,” said Roger Peet, endangered species mural project coordinator. “The fact that its habitat is shrinking due to climate change makes it even more iconic for this moment in time and important to save from extinction.”

The flying squirrel mural is being painted by Portland, Ore. artist Roger Peet and Asheville artist Tricia Tripp.

“It makes my heart happy to be painting flying squirrels – I love these little animals,” Tripp said. “It’s an honor to be able to paint the final piece in the Gateway Mural.”

The event will include music by honky-tonk band Hearts Gone South. Along with the artists, Center scientist Tierra Curry and folk with the local conservation organization Dogwood Alliance will attend the mural celebration.

Carolina northern flying squirrels are secretive, nocturnal gliders found on mountain peaks in western North Carolina, eastern Tennessee and southwest Virginia.
Named for the folds that stretch from their wrists to their ankles allowing them to “fly,” the squirrels are endangered because of threats to their high hardwood forest homes. The squirrels are survivors from the last Ice Age and prefer moist and cool conditions. They are tiny and social, often sharing nest cavities, and have flattened tails that make up 80 percent of their length.

The Center’s endangered species mural project has installed 12 murals in public spaces around the country. Regional murals already in place include a watercress darter in Birmingham, Ala.; a pink mucket pearly mussel in Knoxville, Tenn.; and a white fringeless orchid in Berea, Ky.

“The endangered species mural project brings together art, science and conservation to foster connections between human communities and imperiled wildlife, so we hope this mural inspires people to learn more about saving local endangered species,” said Tierra Curry, a scientist at the Center.

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The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 1.3 million members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.

Courtesy Article

 

Lindsay Barrick to Lead Caldwell Arts Council

Longtime Caldwell resident that benefited from the Council as a student is named Executive Director

Lindsay Barrick

Lindsay Barrick

LENOIR, N.C. – The Caldwell Arts Council (CAC) is pleased to announce that Lindsay Barrick will become its sixth Executive Director, effective April 29. During her time as the CAC Social Media Manager, Barrick has overseen the creation and dissemination of content on various social networking platforms. She has been a long-time advocate and supporter of the CAC, other arts venues, and many individual artists, musicians, writers, and thespians.

She currently serves as Director of Programs and New Media for St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Hickory as well as studio manager and printmaking instructor at the Hickory Museum of Art. A native of West Virginia, she spent most of her formative years in Caldwell County. Barrick is passionate about the arts and the people of Appalachia.

She said, “I am honored and thrilled to serve an organization I have loved since I was a young girl. It will be my great joy to continue the important work of Caldwell Arts Council: introducing school children to live theatre through our Artists in Schools program; preserving traditional Appalachian music through JAM; encouraging participation in poetry and acting through our annual competitions; supporting non-profits and individual artists in their vital efforts through grants; and presenting opportunities for artists and musicians to share in the thrill of exhibiting their craft.”

Barrick continued, “I also look forward to developing new ways to connect our community members and the arts. I have tremendous respect for former Executive Director Lee Carol Giduz and current Executive Director Adrienne Roellgen. I know much can be learned from their leadership.” She also praised the current staff, volunteers and board, adding, “Launi, Cathy, Bob, our dedicated volunteers, generous board members, and I already work so well together. I’m excited about the possibilities going forward.”

Barrick said, “Adrienne will continue to serve as Executive Director through April 28. We appreciate her enduring enthusiasm and love for Caldwell Arts Council. We wish her and her family the very best as they begin an exciting new chapter in Los Angeles.”

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017.

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Now I’m Seriously Peeved at Donald Trump

Mess with the Muppets, and you mess with my family

By Michael M. Barrick

Donald Trump’s determination to build the military-industrial complex and a stupid wall (that just ain’t gonna happen folks!) is so important that he must kill off Big Bird. Public Broadcasting, which is the home of “Sesame Street,” Big Bird, Kermit and their many ethnically and racially diverse family and friends, is targeted for elimination from the federal budget.

So, I’m seriously peeved. You mess with the Muppets and you mess with my family.

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And you don’t mess with my family ‘cause I’m from Wild, Wonderful, Almost Heaven, West-by-God-Virginia, and we are obligated to stand up for our children – and their friends.

Well, when our children were growing up, the Muppets were their only friends on television. There are a couple of reasons for that. First, we were poor; rumors of us having dozens of Chock full o’ Nuts cans buried in the back yard full of cash were simply unfounded. Our children discovered that to their disappointment only after they and their friends had spent a day digging up our yard to no avail, other than to aerate it for me. And, secondly, if we could have afforded cable, we wouldn’t have let them watch the crap on it anyway.

You see, the theory was that the airwaves belonged to the public. So, we could get a PBS station in rural, central West Virginia – and later, more urban North Carolina. Wherever we took our children to live or visit, we knew that this sound programming, full of nothing more than lovely parables about living with one another in harmony – and of course many great lessons in the humanities and sciences – was available.

Sesame_Street_sign.svgAnyway, our children – now 34 and 32 – managed to get through their early childhood by watching only – and learning from – the Muppets and the many lessons they learned on Sesame Street.

We did not miss a Muppet movie. It was from watching “The Muppets Take Manhattan” that we learned from the wise owner of a restaurant that “Peoples is peoples.” That simply profound statement of tolerance, understanding and ultimately acceptance is a critical life lesson, and that phrase – in the context of the plot – could be understood by a child.

Unfortunately, it isn’t understood by Donald Trump. I believe he suffers from arrested development and probably has the outlook of an eight-year-old that never benefited from watching “Sesame Street.”

So, as I said earlier, I’m seriously peeved. Unfortunately, short of writing letters and holding up signs in protest, the best chance we had to prevent this has passed. And for that, we can thank the Democratic National Committee (DNC), and in particular Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Shultz, who as DNC chair last year, did all she could to cheat Bernie Sanders out of the nomination. Since she was quite competent at her job, she and her compatriots among the Democratic Party’s shrinking (but wealthy) elite have ironically caused us to find ourselves at this point. For those thinking it’s unfair to pick on the DNC, I will simply note that it is that defensive, head-in-the-sand attitude that will ensure defeat in the next election cycle. By the way, I’m not a Democrat, so I’m not advocating; just stating the obvious.

So now, the Republicans are in control, doing exactly what they said they would do.

Pbs-logo-800How, then, do we respond? We do our best. We let our voices be heard in Washington. We can support our local PBS and/or NPR stations.

As you consider that and other options, a brief story from about 30 years ago will illustrate the importance of the Muppets to our family – and, truly, to our nation.

We were at the mall. That itself was rare. There was a store there that had something I needed, but I don’t recall the details. But what happened with my wife, Sarah, and our children is quite memorable.

You see, Sarah has a rare ability to mimic perfectly the voices of the Muppets. They told bed-time stories at our home. They had “conversations” with the children through the stuffed versions we had at the house (I still have a small 6”-tall figurine of Kermit as a journalist – in trench coat, pen and pad).

In any event, while waiting on me, they were just inside the entrance to a department store where there was a large Muppet display. To occupy their time, Sarah started bringing the Muppets to life through her various voices. In time, an audience had gathered, enjoying the show as much as Lindsay and Allyn, who gazed at their “talking” Muppet friends, enraptured.

When the time to rendezvous came, Sarah told the children it was time to go. They protested. “We don’t want to go! We want to keep talking to Big Bird!” Sarah insisted. “No, we must go. It’s time to meet Daddy.”

Their response was classic. “We don’t want to meet Daddy. He’s a meanie!” I still wonder what the others watching this show thought. Nevertheless, I dispute that assertion and claim that they didn’t quite know how to express their objections appropriately. (Though they keep saying that).

BigbirdnewversionI learned something very important that day. Do not get between Big Bird and my children. I had senselessly forgotten that the Muppets were part of our family. I learned my lesson that day though, and will always remember it.

So, Republicans, look out. Sesame Street might go through rough times for the next few years because of you. It might come to resemble Detroit even. In time, though, the family and friends of the Muppets will have the day. Why? Because we yearn for community far more than we desire war.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2017

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JAM: ‘Building Community One Tune at a Time’

Inspiring program is preserving music, history and communities of Appalachia

By Michael M. Barrick

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Strictly Strings. Photo by Martin Church.

LENOIR, N.C. – The Junior Appalachian Musicians (JAM) program says on its website “We’re building community one tune at a time.”

That’s a fact, as I saw it on display last night here at the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase. There, among many other great musicians, we saw and heard the group Strictly Strings, which was born out of the Boone, N.C. JAM affiliate. (Learn more here: Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition).

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Strictly Strings on stage. Photo by Lonnie Webster.

Below each photo are statements from JAM’s website. We hope these photos and insights will motivate you to click on the links above and learn more about this vital educational music program that is preserving the history, traditions and communities of Appalachia. If you have a chance to see Strictly Strings or any JAM shows of the roughly 40 affiliates in southern Appalachia, do it! You’ll see and hear history come alive. 

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Members of Caldwell JAM at MerleFest 2016

We envision a world in which all children have the opportunity to experience community through the joy of participating in traditional mountain music together.”

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Strictly Strings as seen on the cover of their album, ‘High on a Mountain.’ Photo by Martin Church.

Our mission is to provide communities the tools and support they need to teach children to play and dance to traditional old time and bluegrass music.”

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Caldwell JAM musicians perform for North Carolina’s legislators on ARTS DAY

 

We believe that children who are actively engaged in traditional mountain music are more connected and better prepared to strengthen their communities for future generations.”

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Strictly Strings photo by Martin Church.

Read about Caldwell, N.C. JAM here. 

© Michael M. Barrick, 2017

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Caldwell JAM Students, Country Duo Round Out Showcase

Annual event offers rich diversity of talent for music lovers

 By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is another installment in a series about the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – ‘Handmade & Heartfelt.’ A list of previous articles is below. The Showcase is scheduled for Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

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JAM Members play for North Carolina’s legislators on ARTS DAY

LENOIR, N.C. – Students learning from the very best of traditional musicians in Caldwell County will be entertaining guests in the stained-glass lobby of the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center as they arrive for the 19th annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase. The students are members of Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians (JAM). Additionally, Blackberry Jam, a small group from Caldwell JAM will play on stage after intermission. It includes Kemdyn Koehler, Avery Sigmon Dalton Sigmon, Jacob Robbins, and Gideon White. Kay Crouch of the host group Strictly Clean and Decent shared, “We welcome these young ‘JAMers’ to the stage.” 

She explained, “JAM is a low-cost, after-school program designed to teach traditional music to children by ear, in order to preserve the oral tradition, and also to give them opportunities to play in both large and small groups.”

According to the Caldwell Arts Council website, “Caldwell JAM … is a program of the Caldwell Arts Council teaching students age 7-17 to play guitar, mandolin, banjo and fiddle with a heavy emphasis on playing traditional and bluegrass music by ear. The classes are taught by some of the region’s most talented artists, many of whom grew up playing old-time or bluegrass. Students also learn about the history of the music, take field trips to music venues, and spend time with musical elders from the community. Caldwell JAM classes are offered at Granite Falls Elementary, Happy Valley K-8, Hudson Elementary, and at in downtown Lenoir in old-time guitar, fiddle, and mandolin.”

JAM at Merlefest

JAM Students at MerleFest 2016

Also sharing the stage will be Lenoir residents Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams, playing country music. According to their Facebook page, Bryan and Williams describe themselves as, “just two guys livin’ out their dreams, pickin’ and singin’ for your entertainment.”  Patrick Crouch offered that the humble description, “ … belies the dedication to their craft which make them two of the most in-demand musicians in Caldwell County. Their unpretentious, ‘what you see is what you get’ sensibility makes them both handmade and heartfelt.”

(Bryant and Williams) are two of the most in-demand musicians in Caldwell County. Their unpretentious, ‘what you see is what you get’ sensibility makes them both handmade and heartfelt.” – Patrick Crouch

In an earlier interview, Crouch explained the genesis of this year’s theme. “Some years I have the title in my brain and then get the musicians that fit. This year, however, I had this group of people who I love and admire as people and musicians that I’ve been wanting to get on the show.  So, it will feature various styles of music – some is original, but all comes from the heart.”

The Showcase is scheduled for tomorrow, Saturday, March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center. Purchase tickets here from the Civic Center.

The Lenoir Voice, 2017. 

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On Twitter: @lenoirvoice

Previous 2017 Showcase Articles

Handmade & Heartfelt: Theme of 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase inspired by area musicians

Jimmie Griffith Exemplifies Showcase Theme: Music is handmade in Caldwell County and is heartfelt from his native Brazil

Nancy Posey Bringing Her Humor and Wit to Showcase: Calls her role as emcee a mere ‘footnote’ to the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition: Boone-based group brings energy, excellence and creativity to Showcase

Sycamore Bones Just Keeps Creating: Lenoir-based trio bringing their own brand of music to annual Caldwell Showcase

Just Don’t Throw Tomatoes: Max Waters personifies talent, humility and humor that makes the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase a success

Ridgeline Brings ‘High Lonesome Sound’ to Showcase: Influenced by bluegrass greats, Ridgeline plays a hard-driving style

Showcase Performers

This year’s concert will include eight groups or individuals. The total of musicians performing will be around two dozen, in addition to JAM members.

Strictly Clean and Decent with Kay and Patrick Crouch and Ron Shuffler.

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Strictly Clean & Decent

Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Ridgeline: A bluegrass band featuring Jim Matheson on guitar, Mike Nelson on banjo, Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Larry Wright on bass, and Jimmy Houston on guitar.

MaisCeu featuring multi-instrumentalist Jimmie Griffith performing Brazilian music.

Max Waters playing Southern gospel, jazz, and blues piano.

Strictly Strings performing old time and contemporary string band music.  The band is Kathleen Burnett on fiddle and guitar, Anissa Burnett on bass and fiddle, Willow Dillon on banjo, fiddle, bass, and cello, Caleb Coatney on mandolin, banjo, and guitar, and Cecil Gurganus on guitar, fiddle, and bass.

Sycamore Bones with Cory Kinal, Andrew Massey, and Abigail Taylor performing original music.

Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams performing country music.

Nancy Posey will be emcee.

 

Ridgeline Brings ‘High Lonesome Sound’ to Showcase

Influenced by bluegrass greats, Ridgeline plays a hard-driving style

By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is another installment in a series about the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – ‘Handmade & Heartfelt.’ A list of previous articles is below. The Showcase is scheduled for Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

Live Music

LENOIR, N.C. – Just like so many of the musicians that perform in the annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, many of the members of the bluegrass band Ridgeline hold down other jobs that help pay the bills. That does not mean, however, they don’t entertain with enthusiasm and excellence; in fact, it is the passion for the music despite often having to work other jobs – that “handmade and heartfelt” approach to creating it – that has been a primary reason why the Showcase is completing its 19th straight year as an annual event in Lenoir.

Ridgeline features Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Mike Nelson on banjo, Larry Wright on bass, Jim Matheson on guitar, and Jimmy Houston on guitar. Also joining them for the Showcase will be David Parker on mandolin. Kay Crouch, of host group Strictly Clean and Decent, has written this of Ridgeline in her program notes: “The band plays hard-driving bluegrass and bluegrass gospel music that is representative of the ‘high, lonesome sound.’ She added, “Their heartfelt delivery is the cornerstone of every Ridgeline performance.”

They’re just a great group of folks that make up the group Ridgeline. I’m very pleased with the team I’ve got together.” – Tim Greene

Greene expressed delight at the current Ridgeline lineup. “We have a great group of musicians with us. Most of us also manage careers as well. April, for example, is a professor at Appalachian State University. They’re just a great group of folks that make up the group Ridgeline. I’m very pleased with the team I’ve got together.”

He added, “I’ve been playing 23 years professionally. This is the lineup we’ve had for two years and I am very much pleased. The original band was Carolina Harvest. Two of the original members have passed on, so we changed the group’s name. Those folks were Clarence Greene and Doug Greene.”

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Nancy Posey playing the mandolin. She will serve as emcee for the Showcase. Photo by David Courtner.

Greene has a long history in the genre, traveling here and yonder to play. “I used to travel. I played with the James King Band. I played with David Parmley and Continental Divide. There are so many to mention.”

While he does write music, Greene shared, “We will play some original music, and we do a lot of cover tunes right now.” He revealed, “We are in the process of writing and a recording our own CD. It’s taking time but we want to get it right. We want people to enjoy it. We want to be happy with it.”

I saw Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver when I was young. It was the original band. That experience told me right there what I wanted to do.” – Tim Greene

Ridgeline draws from a long line of famous bluegrass musicians. Greene shared that Nelson’s banjo playing is influenced by the legendary Earl Scruggs. The group is also influenced by the work of J. D. Crow. Greene recalled, “I saw Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver when I was young. It was the original band. That experience told me right there what I wanted to do.” He was also influenced by the Osmond Brothers. “There harmony is so pure, which is essential to bluegrass.” He continued, “April likes the old traditional music as well. She’s kind of in to some folk music as well. My step-dad and his daddy played the fiddle. They played a lot with Doc Watson when he was growing up.” He added, “Larry is steeped in the music of IIIrd Tyme Out, Ralph Stanley, Lou Reid and Carolina, and The Country Gentlemen. They influence us all. They were bluegrass icons. We look up to those guys.”

As a result, Greene is hopeful that those influences – familiar also to much of the audience – will resonate with those in the seats. “We want the audience to experience good wholesome music. We want them to enjoy themselves. We enjoy ourselves as we perform. When they come to a Ridgeline show, I want them to be pleased with the music and the show we put on. We don’t want to come off as better than anyone else. We just want to get out there and do the best we can for the folks.”

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The grand finale from a previous Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Greene expressed joy at the opportunity to play in the Showcase. “I was born and raised here in Caldwell County. Larry and Mike were born and raised here. It’s a big deal for us, especially for me because I’ve played the music so long as I’ve traveled the United States and Canada over and over. I finally get to play in front of the hometown crowd. It’s a real honor. The others feel the same way. We’re all proud to play in front of the home town folks. It’s the first time for all of us.”

He concluded, “Patrick and Kay and I have been friends for a long time. I’m thankful Patrick asked us to be part of it. It’s going to be good. I hope we have a big crowd. It’s going to be fun.”

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017. 

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On Twitter: @lenoirvoice

Previous 2017 Showcase Articles

Handmade & Heartfelt: Theme of 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase inspired by area musicians

Jimmie Griffith Exemplifies Showcase Theme: Music is handmade in Caldwell County and is heartfelt from his native Brazil

Nancy Posey Bringing Her Humor and Wit to Showcase: Calls her role as emcee a mere ‘footnote’ to the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition: Boone-based group brings energy, excellence and creativity to Showcase

Sycamore Bones Just Keeps Creating: Lenoir-based trio bringing their own brand of music to annual Caldwell Showcase

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Sycamore Bones on stage. From left, Abigail Taylor, Cory Kinal and Andrew Massey.

Just Don’t Throw Tomatoes: Max Waters personifies talent, humility and humor that makes the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase a success 

Showcase Information and Performers

The 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase will be on Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center. Purchase tickets here from the Civic Center. 

This year’s concert will include eight groups or individuals. The total of musicians performing will be around two dozen, in addition to JAM members.

Strictly Clean and Decent with Kay and Patrick Crouch and Ron Shuffler.

Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Ridgeline: A bluegrass band featuring Jim Matheson on guitar, Mike Nelson on banjo, Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Larry Wright on bass, and Jimmy Houston on guitar.

MaisCeu featuring multi-instrumentalist Jimmie Griffith performing Brazilian music.

Max Waters playing Southern gospel, jazz, and blues piano.

Strictly Strings performing old time and contemporary string band music.  The band is Kathleen Burnett on fiddle and guitar, Anissa Burnett on bass and fiddle, Willow Dillon on banjo, fiddle, bass, and cello, Caleb Coatney on mandolin, banjo, and guitar, and Cecil Gurganus on guitar, fiddle, and bass.

Sycamore Bones with Cory Kinal, Andrew Massey, and Abigail Taylor performing original music.

Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams performing country music.

Nancy Posey will be emcee.

 

Just Don’t Throw Tomatoes

Max Waters personifies talent, humility and humor that makes the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase a success 

By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is another installment in a series about the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – ‘Handmade & Heartfelt.’ A list of previous articles is below. The Showcase is scheduled for Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

Showcase Handmade & Heartfelt logo

LENOIR, N.C. – In addition to “Handmade & Heartfelt” for themes for this year’s Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, perhaps humility and humor should be added also. That is because that is what Max Waters, who plays traditional southern gospel music, brings to the Showcase.

He also brings a ton of talent, 50 years of experience, and the respect of his peers.

Yet, when asked what he hopes the audience will experience from his performance at the Showcase, Waters said, “Well, it would be nice if no one threw tomatoes.”

I just hope the audience has half the fun listening as I expect to have playing.” – Max Waters

He added, “Other than that, I don’t think the couple of numbers I’ll be doing will be a life-changing experience for anyone. Getting to play along with Strictly Clean and Decent will be a great experience and I just hope the audience has half the fun listening as I expect to have playing.”

If longevity is any indication, his set will be a hit. He explained, “Herb Miller, who was a member of the first quartet in which Lenoir native George Younce sang, introduced me to traditional southern gospel music when I was an 18-year-old boy. I’ve spent the past 50 years accompanying groups and singers in that particular genre.”

Kay Crouch, of host group Strictly Clean and Decent, has written this of Waters in her program notes: “Max is the consummate southern gospel pianist. He has a long history with Strictly Clean and Decent, having performed with Patrick’s uncle Cole Crouch in The Messengers, and with Ron’s brother George Shuffler in The Shuffler Family Band, as well as with many others. His playing is heavily influenced by many genres outside of gospel music but it is his joy and contagious enthusiasm that delight his audiences and colleagues alike.”

Max is the consummate artist who plays his instrument flawlessly and totally understands ensemble playing. Max’s joy and enthusiasm is more than contagious. It is a pure delight to share the stage with him.” – Patrick Crouch

Patrick Crouch added, “My Uncle Cole Crouch played music with Max many years ago in the Messengers Gospel group. He talked endlessly about Max’s musical knowledge and his mastery of the piano. Uncle Cole loved Max for his music and for his attitude toward fellow musicians. I had the pleasure of playing music with Max a few years ago and experienced everything my uncle had told me. Max is the consummate artist who plays his instrument flawlessly and totally understands ensemble playing. Max’s joy and enthusiasm is more than contagious. It is a pure delight to share the stage with him.”

Explaining why he enjoys gospel music, Waters explained, “Every song turns out to be a mini message in a powerful format. Some people will come listen to gospel music that would never put their foot in a church door. Gospel has the essence of blues, country and some traditional music. It’s not the same every time. And for me anyway, it is forever challenging.”

He explained, “I do like to do my own arranging, keeping the recognized melody in place but adjusting the harmony (re-harmonization) seems to freshen-up the old familiar hymns.”

Max Waters on piano

Max Waters

Playing in the Showcase is meaningful for Waters for a number of reasons. He explained, “I was born in the Kings Creek community of Caldwell County in 1948 and today live in the Kings Creek community not a quarter mile from where I was raised. Having traveled around the world numerous times I can say without hesitation that, as far as I am concerned, no place compares with the quality of life we experience in this part of God’s green earth.”

He continued, “The Showcase is special to me because it gives me the opportunity to play along with Patrick of Strictly Clean and Decent, whose uncle Cole Crouch was my musical mentor. Cole passed away some time ago, but make no mistake about it – the man was a musical genius whose guitar work was among the best in the business.”

He concluded, “I just appreciate the opportunity to play with Strictly Clean and Decent. I have traveled all over. It is quite a pleasant experience to play again with Patrick. It’s going to be a whole lot of fun.” 

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017. 

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On Twitter: @lenoirvoice

Previous 2017 Showcase Articles

Handmade & Heartfelt: Theme of 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase inspired by area musicians

Jimmie Griffith Exemplifies Showcase Theme: Music is handmade in Caldwell County and is heartfelt from his native Brazil

Nancy Posey Bringing Her Humor and Wit to Showcase: Calls her role as emcee a mere ‘footnote’ to the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition: Boone-based group brings energy, excellence and creativity to Showcase

Sycamore Bones Just Keeps Creating: Lenoir-based trio bringing their own brand of music to annual Caldwell Showcase

Showcase Information and Performers

The 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase will be on Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center. Purchase tickets here from the Civic Center. 

This year’s concert will include eight groups or individuals. The total of musicians performing will be around two dozen, in addition to JAM members.

Strictly Clean and Decent with Kay and Patrick Crouch and Ron Shuffler.

Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Ridgeline: A bluegrass band featuring Jim Matheson on guitar, Mike Nelson on banjo, Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Larry Wright on bass, and Jimmy Houston on guitar.

MaisCeu featuring multi-instrumentalist Jimmie Griffith performing Brazilian music.

Max Waters playing Southern gospel, jazz, and blues piano.

Strictly Strings performing old time and contemporary string band music.  The band is Kathleen Burnett on fiddle and guitar, Anissa Burnett on bass and fiddle, Willow Dillon on banjo, fiddle, bass, and cello, Caleb Coatney on mandolin, banjo, and guitar, and Cecil Gurganus on guitar, fiddle, and bass.

strictly-strings-4

Strictly Strings as seen on the cover of their album, ‘High on a Mountain.’ Photo by Martin Church.

Sycamore Bones with Cory Kinal, Andrew Massey, and Abigail Taylor performing original music.

Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams performing country music.

Nancy Posey will be emcee.