Tag Archives: Caldwell Arts Council

Lindsay Barrick to Lead Caldwell Arts Council

Longtime Caldwell resident that benefited from the Council as a student is named Executive Director

Lindsay Barrick

Lindsay Barrick

LENOIR, N.C. – The Caldwell Arts Council (CAC) is pleased to announce that Lindsay Barrick will become its sixth Executive Director, effective April 29. During her time as the CAC Social Media Manager, Barrick has overseen the creation and dissemination of content on various social networking platforms. She has been a long-time advocate and supporter of the CAC, other arts venues, and many individual artists, musicians, writers, and thespians.

She currently serves as Director of Programs and New Media for St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Hickory as well as studio manager and printmaking instructor at the Hickory Museum of Art. A native of West Virginia, she spent most of her formative years in Caldwell County. Barrick is passionate about the arts and the people of Appalachia.

She said, “I am honored and thrilled to serve an organization I have loved since I was a young girl. It will be my great joy to continue the important work of Caldwell Arts Council: introducing school children to live theatre through our Artists in Schools program; preserving traditional Appalachian music through JAM; encouraging participation in poetry and acting through our annual competitions; supporting non-profits and individual artists in their vital efforts through grants; and presenting opportunities for artists and musicians to share in the thrill of exhibiting their craft.”

Barrick continued, “I also look forward to developing new ways to connect our community members and the arts. I have tremendous respect for former Executive Director Lee Carol Giduz and current Executive Director Adrienne Roellgen. I know much can be learned from their leadership.” She also praised the current staff, volunteers and board, adding, “Launi, Cathy, Bob, our dedicated volunteers, generous board members, and I already work so well together. I’m excited about the possibilities going forward.”

Barrick said, “Adrienne will continue to serve as Executive Director through April 28. We appreciate her enduring enthusiasm and love for Caldwell Arts Council. We wish her and her family the very best as they begin an exciting new chapter in Los Angeles.”

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017.

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Art Exhibit to Explore Impact of Mountain Top Removal and Fracking

‘Fractured Sanctuary’ considers destruction to the environment

By Michael M. Barrick

HICKORY, N.C. – Lindsay Barrick’s latest body of work – “Fractured Sanctuary” – is part of her ongoing series dealing with the destruction of the natural world and the people who are called to aid in its reconciliation. The exhibit will hang at the Bethlehem Branch Library in Alexander County, N.C. from August 7 until September 25 as part of the Exhibiting Artist Series. She will also show at the United Arts Council of Catawba County in January 2015.

"Your Hands Can Heal"

“Your Hands Can Heal”

Five years ago, the mixed media artist attended a social justice class at her grandparents’ parish in Bridgeport, W.Va. The topic was mountaintop removal. She revealed, “My life was rocked when I learned of the magnitude of the devastation.” Raised to be an outspoken advocate for environmental justice, she became especially passionate about issues relating to mountaintop removal and hydraulic fracturing.

“Fractured Sanctuary” explores themes of demolition and insatiability, attempting to convey the ugly, dirty side of ‘progress.’ All works are one-of-a-kind artist proofs. A West Virginia native, she lives and creates in western North Carolina. She draws strength and inspiration from the ancient Appalachian hills and continues to work on an ever-expanding series that explores themes of destruction and reconciliation of the natural world.

In “Fractured Sanctuary,” each piece was made using an etching press. Other than producing a block carving Christmas card in 1993, she had never worked in the indirect process. She took her first printmaking class with Thomas Thielemann in the spring of 2014. “Fractured Sanctuary” is the direct result of learning how to create monotypes, intaglio prints, and collagraphs at Caldwell Community College. Most of the work was made on the Hickory Museum of Art’s intaglio press.

Barrick said, “I am thrilled to partner with one of my favorite non-profits – Appalachian Voices – an organization which advocates for cleaner energy sources in Appalachia and the whole of America, particularly shining the light on the costs of mountaintop removal and hydraulic fracturing.” Ten percent of all sales will benefit the important work of Appalachian Voices.

The artist was awarded a Regional Artist Grant by the United Arts Council (2012) and a full scholarship from Windgate Charitable Foundation (2013) to study encaustic painting from renowned artists Celia Gray, Elizabeth Tomasetti, and Fawn Potash at Penland School of Craft. She is in the process of converting an old garage into an encaustic and printing studio.

Lindsay’s small-scale collages, made entirely from found objects and recycled material, were featured in the 2012 two-person show, “Up Close & Far Away.” Her work was selected as part of “Concertina, Interpreted,” an invitational exhibition at Caldwell Arts Council based upon North Carolina Poet Laureate Joseph Bathanti’s latest book of poetry.

Lindsay creates from her Jazz Age home in the Green Park neighborhood of Hickory. She has studied with Jacquelyn Mate, Thomas Thielemann, Lynda Lea Bonkemeyer, Damon Hood, Jean Cauthen, and Mary Dobbin. As facilitator of the Hickory Museum of Art’s Open Studio, she often paints alongside other artists, including Kate Worm, Stephen Brooks, Matthew Good, Clay James, and Joel Kincaid.

Barrick is a founding member of Harmony Arts Collaborative, the co-founder of The Boating Party, and a co-founder of Painting with Peers. She coordinates art projects for a local non-profit and is passionate about promoting and collaborating with other artists, writers, and musicians.

“Fractured Sanctuary” is dedicated to the memory of her paternal grandmother, Minetta Lane “Sparky” Barrick – a life-long advocate for the down-and-outs and underdogs – and to her parents for their constant encouragement and deep love of the mountains. Lindsay’s niece Atleigh, who is already an artist at five, is a huge inspiration. The impetus for the work comes from Lindsay’s deep desire to leave the world more beautiful for Atleigh and those who will follow.

© Michael Barrick/Appalachian Chronicle, 2014.

(Note: Lindsay Barrick is the daughter of Michael Barrick).