Tag Archives: Caldwell Arts Council

Poetry Caldwell Features Jonathan K. Rice in Western N.C.

Caldwell Arts Council to host event Oct. 18, which includes Open Mic time

LENOIR, N.C. – After a short summer break, Poetry Caldwell is back at the Caldwell Arts Council (CAC), with artist and poet Jonathan Kevin Rice set to appear on Oct. 18. As always, Poetry Caldwell is free and open to all.

JONATHAN RICE

Held in the upstairs gallery, the event starts at 6:30 p.m. A short open mic will be held following Rice’s reading. Interested individuals may sign up to participate in open mic by calling the CAC at (828) 754-2486.

Rice edited Iodine Poetry Journal for 17 years and served as a co-editor for Kakalak in 2016. He most recently co-edited “Of Burgers & Barrooms,” an anthology published by Main Street Rag Publishing in 2017.

He is the author of two full-length poetry collections, “Killing Time” (2015), “Ukulele and Other Poems” (2006) and a chapbook, “Shooting Pool with a Cellist” (2003), all published by Main Street Rag Publishing. His poetry and art have appeared in numerous publications, including The Aurorean, Cold Mountain Review, Comstock Review, Empty Mirror, Gargoyle, Inflectionist Review, Levure Litteraire, The Main Street Rag, Wild Goose Poetry Review and the anthologies, “Hand in Hand: Poets Respond to Race” and “The Southern Poetry Anthology VII: North Carolina.”

His art has appeared in a number of group and solo exhibits in the Carolinas. Most recently his show “Excursions: Paintings by Jonathan K. Rice,” ran through June 2018 at the North Charleston City Gallery.

He is the recipient of the 2012 Irene Blair Honeycutt Legacy Award for outstanding service in support of local and regional writers, awarded by Central Piedmont Community College. Rice lives in Charlotte.

For further information about Poetry Caldwell or any CAC programming, contact the Caldwell Arts Council at 828-754-248 or info@caldwellarts.com.

Caldwell Arts councilThe Caldwell Arts Council presents the arts in all its forms to the people of Caldwell County. Located at 601 College Avenue SW in Lenoir, N.C. 28645, the CAC is open Tuesday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018. Photo of Jonathan K. Rice provided by CAC. Feature (Home page) photo by Trust “Tru” Katsande on Unsplash

Editor’s note: When first posted, Mr. Rice’s first name was spelled incorrectly in the headline. Sorry for the error.

 

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The Spirit and Beauty of Ireland coming to North Carolina Foothills

Caldwell Art Council’s newest exhibit ‘Double Vision: Artists in Ireland’ opens Friday

An additional exhibit, ‘Correspondence: A Postcards Show,’ is included; sales benefit the CAC

LENOIR, N.C. – Two exhibitions and an artist talk are opening at the Caldwell Arts Council (CAC) this Friday, Oct. 5.

“Double Vision: Artists in Ireland” will feature North Carolina artists Jean Cauthen and Diane Pike. Cauthen, a professor as well as a painter, is from Charlotte. Pike is from Denver.

The other exhibit, “Correspondence: A Postcards Show” is an artist invitational with each exhibiting artist creating one or two works of art utilizing a 4” x 6” substrate, with all sales of postcards artwork benefitting the CAC.

Oct 18 exhibit Cauthen on left Pike on Right

Jean Cauthen (left), and Diane Pike painting in Ireland. Courtesy photo.

The exhibitions begin with an artist talk by Cauthen at 4:30 Friday afternoon, followed by a reception hosted by the Lenoir Service League from 5 to 7. In her talk, “From Studio to Suitcase,” Cauthen presents the pleasures and humorous perils of art travel. With examples of Degas in New Orleans and Monet in Venice she explores the effects of travel on an artist’s body of work. In her own work, she demonstrates how Irish Scones, Guinness, and Pub Theatre have swayed her own dubious artistic choices.

Cauthen holds an MFA in Painting and Drawing from James Madison University, a BFA in Painting and Drawing from East Carolina University, and a BA in Writing and Editing from North Carolina State University. She has 20 years of college level teaching experience including courses in Painting, Art History, and Creativity. She also leads groups to Italy for landscape painting and Art History. Cauthen is currently and adjunct professor at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, where she teaches Painting, Drawing, and Art History.

In an artist’s statement, Cauthen offers a testimonial to the influence of the Olive Stack Gallery residency upon her art. If follows:

There is not a single Olive Stack Artist who does not conclude their residency believing that the town of Listowel may be the most magical place on earth! The warmth of the residents, the beauty of the streets, surroundings and Olive herself serve as inspiration and balm for any creative spirit. 

Artists reside in a cozy, beautifully appointed apartment situated above the gallery and in the center of the bustling town. One of the great joys of the month is to merely sit with a cup of tea overlooking the ‘small square,’ In this spot, dubbed “window theater,” you can watch as shops open and life bustles through the streets. 

It has been my great fortune to be able to count many of those who bustle through as ‘good friends.’ The luxury of having a month-long stay is the opportunity of working daily to grow your artwork. As a plein air painter, every session of painting the streets of Listowel or the Cliffs of Ballybunion, builds on the previous session. Upon return to the studio (part of the apartment), I can place the artwork on the ledge and see progression and clear areas to work on during the next painting session. Also, with a month of work, I did not consider each work as precious, knowing I would be back that next day to have another ‘go’ at it. With this, I felt free to take risks and try new approaches. 

Because of the residency, Ireland and Listowel have become a part of my own yearly rhythms. After three years of returning to Listowel, I must consider whether I teach, paint, tour, or simply ‘hang out’ with my -now-friends, is my only question. Whether I return or not is not even a question. This is what the Olive Stack Residency has meant to this little painter.

Pike was born in Iowa and moved to Boulder, Colo. at an early age. Boulder was home for 50 years until the Lake Norman area became her residence in late 2008. Pike graduated from the University of Northern Colorado in 1975 with a focus on graphic design and printmaking. She took her first painting class in 2002, learning the Henry Hensche tradition – The Art of Color Seeing – studying the effect that light has on color. This approach fuels Pike’s paintings and infuses them with saturated color and abstract shapes. She paints full-time at her Lake Norman studio and teaches several workshops a year throughout the United States and Ireland. She is a Signature Member of Plein Air Artists Colorado and of the Pastel Society of Colorado, and a member of the Piedmont Pastel Society in North Carolina.

Caldwell Arts councilThe exhibitions continue through the end of November. The Caldwell Arts Council presents the arts in all its forms to the people of Caldwell County. Located at 601 College Avenue in Lenoir, the Caldwell Arts Council is open Tuesday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

Courtesy submission. 

Lindsay Barrick to Lead Caldwell Arts Council

Longtime Caldwell resident that benefited from the Council as a student is named Executive Director

Lindsay Barrick

Lindsay Barrick

LENOIR, N.C. – The Caldwell Arts Council (CAC) is pleased to announce that Lindsay Barrick will become its sixth Executive Director, effective April 29. During her time as the CAC Social Media Manager, Barrick has overseen the creation and dissemination of content on various social networking platforms. She has been a long-time advocate and supporter of the CAC, other arts venues, and many individual artists, musicians, writers, and thespians.

She currently serves as Director of Programs and New Media for St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Hickory as well as studio manager and printmaking instructor at the Hickory Museum of Art. A native of West Virginia, she spent most of her formative years in Caldwell County. Barrick is passionate about the arts and the people of Appalachia.

She said, “I am honored and thrilled to serve an organization I have loved since I was a young girl. It will be my great joy to continue the important work of Caldwell Arts Council: introducing school children to live theatre through our Artists in Schools program; preserving traditional Appalachian music through JAM; encouraging participation in poetry and acting through our annual competitions; supporting non-profits and individual artists in their vital efforts through grants; and presenting opportunities for artists and musicians to share in the thrill of exhibiting their craft.”

Barrick continued, “I also look forward to developing new ways to connect our community members and the arts. I have tremendous respect for former Executive Director Lee Carol Giduz and current Executive Director Adrienne Roellgen. I know much can be learned from their leadership.” She also praised the current staff, volunteers and board, adding, “Launi, Cathy, Bob, our dedicated volunteers, generous board members, and I already work so well together. I’m excited about the possibilities going forward.”

Barrick said, “Adrienne will continue to serve as Executive Director through April 28. We appreciate her enduring enthusiasm and love for Caldwell Arts Council. We wish her and her family the very best as they begin an exciting new chapter in Los Angeles.”

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017.

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Art Exhibit to Explore Impact of Mountain Top Removal and Fracking

‘Fractured Sanctuary’ considers destruction to the environment

By Michael M. Barrick

HICKORY, N.C. – Lindsay Barrick’s latest body of work – “Fractured Sanctuary” – is part of her ongoing series dealing with the destruction of the natural world and the people who are called to aid in its reconciliation. The exhibit will hang at the Bethlehem Branch Library in Alexander County, N.C. from August 7 until September 25 as part of the Exhibiting Artist Series. She will also show at the United Arts Council of Catawba County in January 2015.

"Your Hands Can Heal"

“Your Hands Can Heal”

Five years ago, the mixed media artist attended a social justice class at her grandparents’ parish in Bridgeport, W.Va. The topic was mountaintop removal. She revealed, “My life was rocked when I learned of the magnitude of the devastation.” Raised to be an outspoken advocate for environmental justice, she became especially passionate about issues relating to mountaintop removal and hydraulic fracturing.

“Fractured Sanctuary” explores themes of demolition and insatiability, attempting to convey the ugly, dirty side of ‘progress.’ All works are one-of-a-kind artist proofs. A West Virginia native, she lives and creates in western North Carolina. She draws strength and inspiration from the ancient Appalachian hills and continues to work on an ever-expanding series that explores themes of destruction and reconciliation of the natural world.

In “Fractured Sanctuary,” each piece was made using an etching press. Other than producing a block carving Christmas card in 1993, she had never worked in the indirect process. She took her first printmaking class with Thomas Thielemann in the spring of 2014. “Fractured Sanctuary” is the direct result of learning how to create monotypes, intaglio prints, and collagraphs at Caldwell Community College. Most of the work was made on the Hickory Museum of Art’s intaglio press.

Barrick said, “I am thrilled to partner with one of my favorite non-profits – Appalachian Voices – an organization which advocates for cleaner energy sources in Appalachia and the whole of America, particularly shining the light on the costs of mountaintop removal and hydraulic fracturing.” Ten percent of all sales will benefit the important work of Appalachian Voices.

The artist was awarded a Regional Artist Grant by the United Arts Council (2012) and a full scholarship from Windgate Charitable Foundation (2013) to study encaustic painting from renowned artists Celia Gray, Elizabeth Tomasetti, and Fawn Potash at Penland School of Craft. She is in the process of converting an old garage into an encaustic and printing studio.

Lindsay’s small-scale collages, made entirely from found objects and recycled material, were featured in the 2012 two-person show, “Up Close & Far Away.” Her work was selected as part of “Concertina, Interpreted,” an invitational exhibition at Caldwell Arts Council based upon North Carolina Poet Laureate Joseph Bathanti’s latest book of poetry.

Lindsay creates from her Jazz Age home in the Green Park neighborhood of Hickory. She has studied with Jacquelyn Mate, Thomas Thielemann, Lynda Lea Bonkemeyer, Damon Hood, Jean Cauthen, and Mary Dobbin. As facilitator of the Hickory Museum of Art’s Open Studio, she often paints alongside other artists, including Kate Worm, Stephen Brooks, Matthew Good, Clay James, and Joel Kincaid.

Barrick is a founding member of Harmony Arts Collaborative, the co-founder of The Boating Party, and a co-founder of Painting with Peers. She coordinates art projects for a local non-profit and is passionate about promoting and collaborating with other artists, writers, and musicians.

“Fractured Sanctuary” is dedicated to the memory of her paternal grandmother, Minetta Lane “Sparky” Barrick – a life-long advocate for the down-and-outs and underdogs – and to her parents for their constant encouragement and deep love of the mountains. Lindsay’s niece Atleigh, who is already an artist at five, is a huge inspiration. The impetus for the work comes from Lindsay’s deep desire to leave the world more beautiful for Atleigh and those who will follow.

© Michael Barrick/Appalachian Chronicle, 2014.

(Note: Lindsay Barrick is the daughter of Michael Barrick).