Tag Archives: Lenoir NC

My White. Male. Privileged. Life. (Part I)

What happened to being judged by the content of our character?

FTR Confederate monumentLENOIR, N.C. – This past weekend, I had a long, enjoyable conversation with a dear friend. We make sort of an odd couple, which I love. We have the same general worldview, but we don’t have similar backgrounds. He is rational; I’m emotional.

So, it helps that he is patient and accepts that I get a bit passionate sometimes.

Like this weekend, when he hit me with all the benefits I enjoy from my White. Male. Privilege.

Confederate raiders in Lenoir

I did not and do not dispute that I am a beneficiary of my birth. I know of instances that I have enjoyed the benefit of the doubt from a police officer that a black person, for instance, would not enjoy.

Still, I will admit to becoming somewhat defensive at his remarks. I simply denied that my birth defined my character.

You can decide for yourself by reading on.

Confederate flagIn November 1998, I was elected to the Caldwell County Board of Education. I was sworn into office sometime in early December. My first act as a school board member was to use the bully pulpit of the Lenoir News-Topic. In that op-ed, I called for a ban of the Confederate flag on school grounds – t-shirts, hats, flags in trucks, it didn’t matter. My reason was simple. I knew that it was generally being used as a symbol of intimidation, if not outright hate.

The reaction to my essay was fast and furious. Had I written it a few days before Election Day, I would not have been elected. I heard the usual arguments – the flag is our heritage. The Civil War was about state’s rights, not slavery. While there are thin slivers of truth to the latter argument, it is not the motivating factor to fly the rebel flag in Caldwell County.

This is how I know. After that column was published in the newspaper, I attended my very first Caldwell County Republican Executive Committee meeting (for being a Republican, I plead temporary insanity). Anyway, the first order of business was for the party to present me with a Confederate flag with black letters emblazoned across it saying, “Hell No I Won’t Come Down.” Though I was initially stunned, I quickly recovered. I replied, “I accept this in the spirit in which it is offered.”

Frankly, I don’t think too many people there got what I meant so let me make it clear now. Hate. That flag was given to me in the spirit of hate.

Confederate flag on house

Then, after two-and-a-half years of sitting on the school board, I realized I was in the wrong place in the school system. I wanted to teach again. Fortunately, it worked out for me and I ended up at South Caldwell High School, where there were about 1,400 white students and one black student. There was also a small population of students from Mexico and Central America (and no, I didn’t check papers for ICE, nor would I ever).

From the first day, I would challenge the students that were wearing rebel flags on t-shirts as they walked into my classroom, asking them why they were doing so. To a person, I got the answer, “It’s our heritage.” So, I immediately peppered them with questions about their “heritage.” I would ask, among other things:

  1. What heritage are you celebrating?
  2. Who were the leaders of that heritage?
  3. What was the objective of that heritage?
  4. Do you know the context of that heritage in relationship to our nation’s founding and economic growth?
  5. Have you considered how that image might affect others in this school that recoil – maybe even in fear – at seeing you wear that shirt?

FTR confederate flag

And on the questions went until they slid into their seat, mute. I might have made them think, but now, as I look around Caldwell County, I kind of doubt it. At the end of the Civil War, Union soldiers called Lenoir “The damedest little rebel town.” I wasn’t here in 1865, but I’d be willing to bet there are as many – if not more – Confederate flags flying in Caldwell County right now, especially when one counts the license plates and bumper stickers.

Now, let me pause and say I believe the First Amendment offers protection to people who wish to fly the rebel flag on private property or affix a rebel flag on their truck bumper.

However, as a school board member and a teacher that wanted a safe classroom, civil discussion, and most importantly – an accurate portrayal of history – allowing that flag to fly in our schools was too much then and it’s too much now. It is an affront to education and terrifying to minority children.

I admit to being born White. Male. Privileged. However, I was raised to overcome that by a whole village of elders, teachers and neighbors.

Now then, how did a White. Privileged. Male. get to this point?

It’s how the hell I was raised. I was born in Harrison County, West Virginia. It was the hotbed of anti-secessionist movements when Virginia seceded from the Union. Eventually, many of West Virginia’s first leaders would come out of Harrison County.

Additionally, my great-great-great-great grandfather established the first Union newspaper in Morgantown in 1862, while it was still part of Virginia. That took gumption. That blood – or should I say ink – runs in my veins.

So, I admit to being born White. Male. Privileged. However, I was raised to overcome that by a whole village of elders, teachers and neighbors.

It is true, that when I was born, I had to be with my mom. She was white, as was my dad.

Martin Luther King JrBut you must also remember that it was Martin Luther King Jr. who challenged us to judge one another by our character. In fact, I developed a week-long study of the life and literature of Dr. King for my sophomore English students. As powerful as his “I Have a Dream” speech was for the students, what really started to challenge their outlook was reading his “Letter from Birmingham Jail.”

Oh, and my wife just reminded me of some writing I did while at the News-Topic as a reporter in the mid-1990s. I met with elders in the black community about the many challenges facing it, and I was surprised to find many within the community critical of it; yes, they talked with hard experience of suffering under white, male, privilege. But they also argued that the generations behind them had to continue the battle to overcome it.

So yes, it’s a long struggle. But I, by my birth, did not contribute to it. I have, however, to the best of my ability, helped how I could through what talents I have, to counter it.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018. Top photo is part of the inscription on the Confederate Monument in Lenoir. Flags are on home near downtown Lenoir. Historical marker is in downtown Lenoir. Other Confederate flags in the public domain. Martin Luther King Jr. photo in the public domain.

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Where are the Democrats?

Is Appalachia heading towards another red autumn?

By Michael M. Barrick

LENOIR, N.C. – If the Democratic Party is going to enjoy a “Blue Wave” in this year’s mid-term elections, it isn’t going to start in Caldwell County. That is if the campaign activity – or the lack thereof – by the Democratic Party and its candidates at the One-Stop (early) Voting location in Lenoir is any indication.

GOP poll workers

GOP volunteers work the Lenoir early voting location on the first day of voting, Oct. 17.

Also, the first day of early voting totals reveal an energized Republican base. At the county’s two early voting locations in Lenoir and Granite Falls, a total of 1,217 voters turned out. Of those, 632 were Republicans, making up 52 percent of the total vote. The 329 Democratic voters accounted for 27 percent of the vote, numbers consistent with their registration levels. Unaffiliated voters accounted for 251 ballots, making up 20 percent of voters. Less than one percent cast ballots as Libertarians.

Also of note is that of the total votes cast, 473 – 39 percent of the voting – took place in the predominantly Republican south end of the county at the Shuford Recreation Center in Granite Falls. The only precincts in the county that could be considered remotely favorable for Democrats are centered in and near Lenoir. Low turnout there combined with the absence of Democratic candidates and poll workers would not seem to lend itself to a Blue Wave anywhere in the county.

Also, in the year of the #MeToo movement, women were outvoted by men yesterday by about four percent. Women cast 48 percent of the ballots – a total of 580. Men cast 633. Blacks cast 70 ballots, nearly six percent, a number relatively consistent with population totals in the county.

Mark Cook and Sherri Yi.jpg

Mark Cook and Sherri Yi campaigned for Kim Clark on the first day of early voting in N.C.

The Democrats did not have a tent set up as customary, and only two people were actively campaigning for a Democrat. Incumbent Clerk of Superior Court Kim Clark had two people volunteering for her, but they were both Republicans. And one was her husband, Mark Cook. The other was Sherri Yi.

Ironically, the only incident of acrimony I witnessed was when Cook and Yi attempted to hand some campaign literature to a voter wearing a Trump hat. Flipping his hand towards them like he would a bothersome cat, he grumbled, “She’s a Democrat. I don’t vote for Democrats.” Yi simply replied, “Yes sir,” and backed away.

Nathan E Dula

Nathan E. Dula campaigns for School Board candidate Elaine Setzer-Maxwell on Oct. 17

School Board candidate Elaine Setzer-Maxwell had a campaign volunteer out, Nathan E. Dula. He had positioned himself under a small shade tree and was approaching potential voters alone without having to compete with other volunteers. Closer to the doors of the ground floor of the City/County Chambers on West Ave., though, no less than a half-dozen GOP workers approached every voter. Some voters strolled on by, but many stopped to chat and take a copy of the party’s sample ballot.

Speaking of which, when I went into vote, there was a Republican sample ballot in the voting precinct on top of the stack of county’s official ballots. The two look virtually identical. However only official ballots are allowed. It isn’t clear if it was placed there inadvertently by a voter or intentionally, but when it was pointed out to election officials, it was thrown in the trash.

The official ballot can be seen here. It is printed in yellow, as is the GOP sample ballot. So, look at the top of the ballot on the left-hand corner. It should have Sample Ballot, Caldwell County printed on it, with a bar code in the top right-hand corner. The GOP sample ballot has Republican in the top left-hand box and no bar code in the right. And, of course, they’ve marked the ballot for you. So, be on the lookout for that.

The Republican workers were jovial and talkative. When I asked where the Democrats were, they mentioned the name of one veteran Democrat, saying he had stopped by for a while. Meanwhile, the GOP workers had several of their candidates popping in and out.

Oh, and there was no shortage of poignant bumper stickers.

Taking Back the Rainbox and Trump 2020 signs

One day does not an election make. However, for a party that is supposed to be energized to send Freshmen legislators to Raleigh to help Gov. Roy Cooper and to break the 5-0 hold the GOP has on the county commission, one would expect to see a blaze of blue at the polling places. The only thing I saw blue was the clear sky above me – perfect for greeting voters.

How and Where to Vote

According to the Caldwell County Board of Elections, here is what you need to know about voting this year:

If you have not yet registered to vote, you can register when coming to One Stop/Early Voting.

There are 2 One Stop/Early Voting Locations:

  1. Caldwell County Alden E. Starnes County Office Plaza
    City/County Chambers
    905 West Avenue NW, Lenoir
  2. Shuford Recreation Center
    56 Pinewood Road, Granite Falls

The One Stop/Early Voting Dates and Time:
Wednesday, October 17 through Friday, October 19: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Monday, October 22 through Friday, October 26: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Monday, October 29 through Friday, November 2: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Saturday, November 3 – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.  (the only Saturday)

The Last Day to Apply for Absentee Ballot – October 30, 2018

Click Here to See 2018 Sample Ballot 

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018.

The Spirit and Beauty of Ireland coming to North Carolina Foothills

Caldwell Art Council’s newest exhibit ‘Double Vision: Artists in Ireland’ opens Friday

An additional exhibit, ‘Correspondence: A Postcards Show,’ is included; sales benefit the CAC

LENOIR, N.C. – Two exhibitions and an artist talk are opening at the Caldwell Arts Council (CAC) this Friday, Oct. 5.

“Double Vision: Artists in Ireland” will feature North Carolina artists Jean Cauthen and Diane Pike. Cauthen, a professor as well as a painter, is from Charlotte. Pike is from Denver.

The other exhibit, “Correspondence: A Postcards Show” is an artist invitational with each exhibiting artist creating one or two works of art utilizing a 4” x 6” substrate, with all sales of postcards artwork benefitting the CAC.

Oct 18 exhibit Cauthen on left Pike on Right

Jean Cauthen (left), and Diane Pike painting in Ireland. Courtesy photo.

The exhibitions begin with an artist talk by Cauthen at 4:30 Friday afternoon, followed by a reception hosted by the Lenoir Service League from 5 to 7. In her talk, “From Studio to Suitcase,” Cauthen presents the pleasures and humorous perils of art travel. With examples of Degas in New Orleans and Monet in Venice she explores the effects of travel on an artist’s body of work. In her own work, she demonstrates how Irish Scones, Guinness, and Pub Theatre have swayed her own dubious artistic choices.

Cauthen holds an MFA in Painting and Drawing from James Madison University, a BFA in Painting and Drawing from East Carolina University, and a BA in Writing and Editing from North Carolina State University. She has 20 years of college level teaching experience including courses in Painting, Art History, and Creativity. She also leads groups to Italy for landscape painting and Art History. Cauthen is currently and adjunct professor at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, where she teaches Painting, Drawing, and Art History.

In an artist’s statement, Cauthen offers a testimonial to the influence of the Olive Stack Gallery residency upon her art. If follows:

There is not a single Olive Stack Artist who does not conclude their residency believing that the town of Listowel may be the most magical place on earth! The warmth of the residents, the beauty of the streets, surroundings and Olive herself serve as inspiration and balm for any creative spirit. 

Artists reside in a cozy, beautifully appointed apartment situated above the gallery and in the center of the bustling town. One of the great joys of the month is to merely sit with a cup of tea overlooking the ‘small square,’ In this spot, dubbed “window theater,” you can watch as shops open and life bustles through the streets. 

It has been my great fortune to be able to count many of those who bustle through as ‘good friends.’ The luxury of having a month-long stay is the opportunity of working daily to grow your artwork. As a plein air painter, every session of painting the streets of Listowel or the Cliffs of Ballybunion, builds on the previous session. Upon return to the studio (part of the apartment), I can place the artwork on the ledge and see progression and clear areas to work on during the next painting session. Also, with a month of work, I did not consider each work as precious, knowing I would be back that next day to have another ‘go’ at it. With this, I felt free to take risks and try new approaches. 

Because of the residency, Ireland and Listowel have become a part of my own yearly rhythms. After three years of returning to Listowel, I must consider whether I teach, paint, tour, or simply ‘hang out’ with my -now-friends, is my only question. Whether I return or not is not even a question. This is what the Olive Stack Residency has meant to this little painter.

Pike was born in Iowa and moved to Boulder, Colo. at an early age. Boulder was home for 50 years until the Lake Norman area became her residence in late 2008. Pike graduated from the University of Northern Colorado in 1975 with a focus on graphic design and printmaking. She took her first painting class in 2002, learning the Henry Hensche tradition – The Art of Color Seeing – studying the effect that light has on color. This approach fuels Pike’s paintings and infuses them with saturated color and abstract shapes. She paints full-time at her Lake Norman studio and teaches several workshops a year throughout the United States and Ireland. She is a Signature Member of Plein Air Artists Colorado and of the Pastel Society of Colorado, and a member of the Piedmont Pastel Society in North Carolina.

Caldwell Arts councilThe exhibitions continue through the end of November. The Caldwell Arts Council presents the arts in all its forms to the people of Caldwell County. Located at 601 College Avenue in Lenoir, the Caldwell Arts Council is open Tuesday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

Courtesy submission. 

First Bands of Rain from Florence Arrive Softly in WNC

Deceptively gentle rain, light wind gusts first indicators of monster storm

By Michael M. Barrick

LENOIR, N.C. – The first bands of rain from Tropical Storm Florence began dropping gentle rain and rustling trees with light wind gusts shortly after noon here today.

Still, forecasters at Ray’s Weather Center point out that the likelihood of heavy rain tonight and tomorrow along with life-threatening flash flooding remains. Rainfall amounts could range from 2 to 10 inches, with areas south and east of the Blue Ridge Escarpment most at risk. This includes the northern half of Caldwell County.

Today, however, felt much like a spring rain, so I got out to take a few photos during the “calm before the storm.”

Do not be deceived though. Take all of the precautions that emergency preparedness officials issue. Remember, “It’s not nice to fool with Mother Nature.”

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018.

Flower

Flowers at the J.E. Broyhill Walking park soak up the first raindrops from Florence

Ducks

The ducks found the park pretty much to themselves

Hibriten Mtn

Clouds swirl around Hibriten Mountain

Walking park lake

Gentle rain falls on the lake at J.E. Broyhill Walking park

 

Andrew Massey Living Lenoir’s Legacy

Pickin’ and playing on the porch as old as this Western North Carolina county

Note: This is the first installment in “The Hillbilly Highway, Volume 2: Seeds, Songs and Streams.” I’m beginning as about to close as home as I can get – a neighbor of our daughter. Caldwell County is full of fascinating people and wondrous beauty, so many of our first installments will be from here, but I’m working my way up to at least the Mason-Dixon line over the next few weeks and months. Learn more here.

By Michel M. Barrick

Andrew Massey 1

LENOIR, N.C. – Since the first European pioneers explored the Yadkin Valley and settled Tucker’s Barn – our modern day Lenoir – music has been central to our heritage.

Above, my buddy Andrew Massey takes a few minutes to pick on his guitar on his back deck. Constantly writing, he played two new tunes. Pickin’ and singing on your porch is nothing new in Lenoir or anywhere in Caldwell County. It’s a way of life. Musicians thrive off of each other and the heritage is continued!

It’s always a joy to enjoy the creative offerings of Andrew and his many friends. Indeed, he is part of Sycamore Bones, a local band that plays regionally and played an electrifying set in the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase.

visitlenoirOne thing I concluded for certain from listening to Andrew offer his latest creations on an unseasonably warm and beautifully sunny February afternoon – the arts community truly is the shining light of Lenoir. Lenoir, in turn, continues to play a vital role in the preservation of traditional Appalachian music. It is a must stop along the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area. If interested, learn more here.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018.

Lindsay Barrick to Lead Caldwell Arts Council

Longtime Caldwell resident that benefited from the Council as a student is named Executive Director

Lindsay Barrick

Lindsay Barrick

LENOIR, N.C. – The Caldwell Arts Council (CAC) is pleased to announce that Lindsay Barrick will become its sixth Executive Director, effective April 29. During her time as the CAC Social Media Manager, Barrick has overseen the creation and dissemination of content on various social networking platforms. She has been a long-time advocate and supporter of the CAC, other arts venues, and many individual artists, musicians, writers, and thespians.

She currently serves as Director of Programs and New Media for St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Hickory as well as studio manager and printmaking instructor at the Hickory Museum of Art. A native of West Virginia, she spent most of her formative years in Caldwell County. Barrick is passionate about the arts and the people of Appalachia.

She said, “I am honored and thrilled to serve an organization I have loved since I was a young girl. It will be my great joy to continue the important work of Caldwell Arts Council: introducing school children to live theatre through our Artists in Schools program; preserving traditional Appalachian music through JAM; encouraging participation in poetry and acting through our annual competitions; supporting non-profits and individual artists in their vital efforts through grants; and presenting opportunities for artists and musicians to share in the thrill of exhibiting their craft.”

Barrick continued, “I also look forward to developing new ways to connect our community members and the arts. I have tremendous respect for former Executive Director Lee Carol Giduz and current Executive Director Adrienne Roellgen. I know much can be learned from their leadership.” She also praised the current staff, volunteers and board, adding, “Launi, Cathy, Bob, our dedicated volunteers, generous board members, and I already work so well together. I’m excited about the possibilities going forward.”

Barrick said, “Adrienne will continue to serve as Executive Director through April 28. We appreciate her enduring enthusiasm and love for Caldwell Arts Council. We wish her and her family the very best as they begin an exciting new chapter in Los Angeles.”

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017.

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Caldwell JAM Students, Country Duo Round Out Showcase

Annual event offers rich diversity of talent for music lovers

 By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is another installment in a series about the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – ‘Handmade & Heartfelt.’ A list of previous articles is below. The Showcase is scheduled for Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

JAM 1

JAM Members play for North Carolina’s legislators on ARTS DAY

LENOIR, N.C. – Students learning from the very best of traditional musicians in Caldwell County will be entertaining guests in the stained-glass lobby of the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center as they arrive for the 19th annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase. The students are members of Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians (JAM). Additionally, Blackberry Jam, a small group from Caldwell JAM will play on stage after intermission. It includes Kemdyn Koehler, Avery Sigmon Dalton Sigmon, Jacob Robbins, and Gideon White. Kay Crouch of the host group Strictly Clean and Decent shared, “We welcome these young ‘JAMers’ to the stage.” 

She explained, “JAM is a low-cost, after-school program designed to teach traditional music to children by ear, in order to preserve the oral tradition, and also to give them opportunities to play in both large and small groups.”

According to the Caldwell Arts Council website, “Caldwell JAM … is a program of the Caldwell Arts Council teaching students age 7-17 to play guitar, mandolin, banjo and fiddle with a heavy emphasis on playing traditional and bluegrass music by ear. The classes are taught by some of the region’s most talented artists, many of whom grew up playing old-time or bluegrass. Students also learn about the history of the music, take field trips to music venues, and spend time with musical elders from the community. Caldwell JAM classes are offered at Granite Falls Elementary, Happy Valley K-8, Hudson Elementary, and at in downtown Lenoir in old-time guitar, fiddle, and mandolin.”

JAM at Merlefest

JAM Students at MerleFest 2016

Also sharing the stage will be Lenoir residents Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams, playing country music. According to their Facebook page, Bryan and Williams describe themselves as, “just two guys livin’ out their dreams, pickin’ and singin’ for your entertainment.”  Patrick Crouch offered that the humble description, “ … belies the dedication to their craft which make them two of the most in-demand musicians in Caldwell County. Their unpretentious, ‘what you see is what you get’ sensibility makes them both handmade and heartfelt.”

(Bryant and Williams) are two of the most in-demand musicians in Caldwell County. Their unpretentious, ‘what you see is what you get’ sensibility makes them both handmade and heartfelt.” – Patrick Crouch

In an earlier interview, Crouch explained the genesis of this year’s theme. “Some years I have the title in my brain and then get the musicians that fit. This year, however, I had this group of people who I love and admire as people and musicians that I’ve been wanting to get on the show.  So, it will feature various styles of music – some is original, but all comes from the heart.”

The Showcase is scheduled for tomorrow, Saturday, March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center. Purchase tickets here from the Civic Center.

The Lenoir Voice, 2017. 

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On Twitter: @lenoirvoice

Previous 2017 Showcase Articles

Handmade & Heartfelt: Theme of 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase inspired by area musicians

Jimmie Griffith Exemplifies Showcase Theme: Music is handmade in Caldwell County and is heartfelt from his native Brazil

Nancy Posey Bringing Her Humor and Wit to Showcase: Calls her role as emcee a mere ‘footnote’ to the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition: Boone-based group brings energy, excellence and creativity to Showcase

Sycamore Bones Just Keeps Creating: Lenoir-based trio bringing their own brand of music to annual Caldwell Showcase

Just Don’t Throw Tomatoes: Max Waters personifies talent, humility and humor that makes the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase a success

Ridgeline Brings ‘High Lonesome Sound’ to Showcase: Influenced by bluegrass greats, Ridgeline plays a hard-driving style

Showcase Performers

This year’s concert will include eight groups or individuals. The total of musicians performing will be around two dozen, in addition to JAM members.

Strictly Clean and Decent with Kay and Patrick Crouch and Ron Shuffler.

showcase-scd-2

Strictly Clean & Decent

Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Ridgeline: A bluegrass band featuring Jim Matheson on guitar, Mike Nelson on banjo, Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Larry Wright on bass, and Jimmy Houston on guitar.

MaisCeu featuring multi-instrumentalist Jimmie Griffith performing Brazilian music.

Max Waters playing Southern gospel, jazz, and blues piano.

Strictly Strings performing old time and contemporary string band music.  The band is Kathleen Burnett on fiddle and guitar, Anissa Burnett on bass and fiddle, Willow Dillon on banjo, fiddle, bass, and cello, Caleb Coatney on mandolin, banjo, and guitar, and Cecil Gurganus on guitar, fiddle, and bass.

Sycamore Bones with Cory Kinal, Andrew Massey, and Abigail Taylor performing original music.

Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams performing country music.

Nancy Posey will be emcee.

 

Ridgeline Brings ‘High Lonesome Sound’ to Showcase

Influenced by bluegrass greats, Ridgeline plays a hard-driving style

By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is another installment in a series about the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – ‘Handmade & Heartfelt.’ A list of previous articles is below. The Showcase is scheduled for Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

Live Music

LENOIR, N.C. – Just like so many of the musicians that perform in the annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, many of the members of the bluegrass band Ridgeline hold down other jobs that help pay the bills. That does not mean, however, they don’t entertain with enthusiasm and excellence; in fact, it is the passion for the music despite often having to work other jobs – that “handmade and heartfelt” approach to creating it – that has been a primary reason why the Showcase is completing its 19th straight year as an annual event in Lenoir.

Ridgeline features Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Mike Nelson on banjo, Larry Wright on bass, Jim Matheson on guitar, and Jimmy Houston on guitar. Also joining them for the Showcase will be David Parker on mandolin. Kay Crouch, of host group Strictly Clean and Decent, has written this of Ridgeline in her program notes: “The band plays hard-driving bluegrass and bluegrass gospel music that is representative of the ‘high, lonesome sound.’ She added, “Their heartfelt delivery is the cornerstone of every Ridgeline performance.”

They’re just a great group of folks that make up the group Ridgeline. I’m very pleased with the team I’ve got together.” – Tim Greene

Greene expressed delight at the current Ridgeline lineup. “We have a great group of musicians with us. Most of us also manage careers as well. April, for example, is a professor at Appalachian State University. They’re just a great group of folks that make up the group Ridgeline. I’m very pleased with the team I’ve got together.”

He added, “I’ve been playing 23 years professionally. This is the lineup we’ve had for two years and I am very much pleased. The original band was Carolina Harvest. Two of the original members have passed on, so we changed the group’s name. Those folks were Clarence Greene and Doug Greene.”

nancy-posey-on-mandolin-david-courtner

Nancy Posey playing the mandolin. She will serve as emcee for the Showcase. Photo by David Courtner.

Greene has a long history in the genre, traveling here and yonder to play. “I used to travel. I played with the James King Band. I played with David Parmley and Continental Divide. There are so many to mention.”

While he does write music, Greene shared, “We will play some original music, and we do a lot of cover tunes right now.” He revealed, “We are in the process of writing and a recording our own CD. It’s taking time but we want to get it right. We want people to enjoy it. We want to be happy with it.”

I saw Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver when I was young. It was the original band. That experience told me right there what I wanted to do.” – Tim Greene

Ridgeline draws from a long line of famous bluegrass musicians. Greene shared that Nelson’s banjo playing is influenced by the legendary Earl Scruggs. The group is also influenced by the work of J. D. Crow. Greene recalled, “I saw Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver when I was young. It was the original band. That experience told me right there what I wanted to do.” He was also influenced by the Osmond Brothers. “There harmony is so pure, which is essential to bluegrass.” He continued, “April likes the old traditional music as well. She’s kind of in to some folk music as well. My step-dad and his daddy played the fiddle. They played a lot with Doc Watson when he was growing up.” He added, “Larry is steeped in the music of IIIrd Tyme Out, Ralph Stanley, Lou Reid and Carolina, and The Country Gentlemen. They influence us all. They were bluegrass icons. We look up to those guys.”

As a result, Greene is hopeful that those influences – familiar also to much of the audience – will resonate with those in the seats. “We want the audience to experience good wholesome music. We want them to enjoy themselves. We enjoy ourselves as we perform. When they come to a Ridgeline show, I want them to be pleased with the music and the show we put on. We don’t want to come off as better than anyone else. We just want to get out there and do the best we can for the folks.”

showcase-grand-finale

The grand finale from a previous Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Greene expressed joy at the opportunity to play in the Showcase. “I was born and raised here in Caldwell County. Larry and Mike were born and raised here. It’s a big deal for us, especially for me because I’ve played the music so long as I’ve traveled the United States and Canada over and over. I finally get to play in front of the hometown crowd. It’s a real honor. The others feel the same way. We’re all proud to play in front of the home town folks. It’s the first time for all of us.”

He concluded, “Patrick and Kay and I have been friends for a long time. I’m thankful Patrick asked us to be part of it. It’s going to be good. I hope we have a big crowd. It’s going to be fun.”

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017. 

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On Twitter: @lenoirvoice

Previous 2017 Showcase Articles

Handmade & Heartfelt: Theme of 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase inspired by area musicians

Jimmie Griffith Exemplifies Showcase Theme: Music is handmade in Caldwell County and is heartfelt from his native Brazil

Nancy Posey Bringing Her Humor and Wit to Showcase: Calls her role as emcee a mere ‘footnote’ to the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition: Boone-based group brings energy, excellence and creativity to Showcase

Sycamore Bones Just Keeps Creating: Lenoir-based trio bringing their own brand of music to annual Caldwell Showcase

Sycamore Bones vertical

Sycamore Bones on stage. From left, Abigail Taylor, Cory Kinal and Andrew Massey.

Just Don’t Throw Tomatoes: Max Waters personifies talent, humility and humor that makes the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase a success 

Showcase Information and Performers

The 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase will be on Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center. Purchase tickets here from the Civic Center. 

This year’s concert will include eight groups or individuals. The total of musicians performing will be around two dozen, in addition to JAM members.

Strictly Clean and Decent with Kay and Patrick Crouch and Ron Shuffler.

Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Ridgeline: A bluegrass band featuring Jim Matheson on guitar, Mike Nelson on banjo, Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Larry Wright on bass, and Jimmy Houston on guitar.

MaisCeu featuring multi-instrumentalist Jimmie Griffith performing Brazilian music.

Max Waters playing Southern gospel, jazz, and blues piano.

Strictly Strings performing old time and contemporary string band music.  The band is Kathleen Burnett on fiddle and guitar, Anissa Burnett on bass and fiddle, Willow Dillon on banjo, fiddle, bass, and cello, Caleb Coatney on mandolin, banjo, and guitar, and Cecil Gurganus on guitar, fiddle, and bass.

Sycamore Bones with Cory Kinal, Andrew Massey, and Abigail Taylor performing original music.

Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams performing country music.

Nancy Posey will be emcee.

 

Just Don’t Throw Tomatoes

Max Waters personifies talent, humility and humor that makes the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase a success 

By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is another installment in a series about the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – ‘Handmade & Heartfelt.’ A list of previous articles is below. The Showcase is scheduled for Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

Showcase Handmade & Heartfelt logo

LENOIR, N.C. – In addition to “Handmade & Heartfelt” for themes for this year’s Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, perhaps humility and humor should be added also. That is because that is what Max Waters, who plays traditional southern gospel music, brings to the Showcase.

He also brings a ton of talent, 50 years of experience, and the respect of his peers.

Yet, when asked what he hopes the audience will experience from his performance at the Showcase, Waters said, “Well, it would be nice if no one threw tomatoes.”

I just hope the audience has half the fun listening as I expect to have playing.” – Max Waters

He added, “Other than that, I don’t think the couple of numbers I’ll be doing will be a life-changing experience for anyone. Getting to play along with Strictly Clean and Decent will be a great experience and I just hope the audience has half the fun listening as I expect to have playing.”

If longevity is any indication, his set will be a hit. He explained, “Herb Miller, who was a member of the first quartet in which Lenoir native George Younce sang, introduced me to traditional southern gospel music when I was an 18-year-old boy. I’ve spent the past 50 years accompanying groups and singers in that particular genre.”

Kay Crouch, of host group Strictly Clean and Decent, has written this of Waters in her program notes: “Max is the consummate southern gospel pianist. He has a long history with Strictly Clean and Decent, having performed with Patrick’s uncle Cole Crouch in The Messengers, and with Ron’s brother George Shuffler in The Shuffler Family Band, as well as with many others. His playing is heavily influenced by many genres outside of gospel music but it is his joy and contagious enthusiasm that delight his audiences and colleagues alike.”

Max is the consummate artist who plays his instrument flawlessly and totally understands ensemble playing. Max’s joy and enthusiasm is more than contagious. It is a pure delight to share the stage with him.” – Patrick Crouch

Patrick Crouch added, “My Uncle Cole Crouch played music with Max many years ago in the Messengers Gospel group. He talked endlessly about Max’s musical knowledge and his mastery of the piano. Uncle Cole loved Max for his music and for his attitude toward fellow musicians. I had the pleasure of playing music with Max a few years ago and experienced everything my uncle had told me. Max is the consummate artist who plays his instrument flawlessly and totally understands ensemble playing. Max’s joy and enthusiasm is more than contagious. It is a pure delight to share the stage with him.”

Explaining why he enjoys gospel music, Waters explained, “Every song turns out to be a mini message in a powerful format. Some people will come listen to gospel music that would never put their foot in a church door. Gospel has the essence of blues, country and some traditional music. It’s not the same every time. And for me anyway, it is forever challenging.”

He explained, “I do like to do my own arranging, keeping the recognized melody in place but adjusting the harmony (re-harmonization) seems to freshen-up the old familiar hymns.”

Max Waters on piano

Max Waters

Playing in the Showcase is meaningful for Waters for a number of reasons. He explained, “I was born in the Kings Creek community of Caldwell County in 1948 and today live in the Kings Creek community not a quarter mile from where I was raised. Having traveled around the world numerous times I can say without hesitation that, as far as I am concerned, no place compares with the quality of life we experience in this part of God’s green earth.”

He continued, “The Showcase is special to me because it gives me the opportunity to play along with Patrick of Strictly Clean and Decent, whose uncle Cole Crouch was my musical mentor. Cole passed away some time ago, but make no mistake about it – the man was a musical genius whose guitar work was among the best in the business.”

He concluded, “I just appreciate the opportunity to play with Strictly Clean and Decent. I have traveled all over. It is quite a pleasant experience to play again with Patrick. It’s going to be a whole lot of fun.” 

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017. 

The Lenoir voice on Facebook

On Twitter: @lenoirvoice

Previous 2017 Showcase Articles

Handmade & Heartfelt: Theme of 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase inspired by area musicians

Jimmie Griffith Exemplifies Showcase Theme: Music is handmade in Caldwell County and is heartfelt from his native Brazil

Nancy Posey Bringing Her Humor and Wit to Showcase: Calls her role as emcee a mere ‘footnote’ to the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition: Boone-based group brings energy, excellence and creativity to Showcase

Sycamore Bones Just Keeps Creating: Lenoir-based trio bringing their own brand of music to annual Caldwell Showcase

Showcase Information and Performers

The 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase will be on Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center. Purchase tickets here from the Civic Center. 

This year’s concert will include eight groups or individuals. The total of musicians performing will be around two dozen, in addition to JAM members.

Strictly Clean and Decent with Kay and Patrick Crouch and Ron Shuffler.

Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Ridgeline: A bluegrass band featuring Jim Matheson on guitar, Mike Nelson on banjo, Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Larry Wright on bass, and Jimmy Houston on guitar.

MaisCeu featuring multi-instrumentalist Jimmie Griffith performing Brazilian music.

Max Waters playing Southern gospel, jazz, and blues piano.

Strictly Strings performing old time and contemporary string band music.  The band is Kathleen Burnett on fiddle and guitar, Anissa Burnett on bass and fiddle, Willow Dillon on banjo, fiddle, bass, and cello, Caleb Coatney on mandolin, banjo, and guitar, and Cecil Gurganus on guitar, fiddle, and bass.

strictly-strings-4

Strictly Strings as seen on the cover of their album, ‘High on a Mountain.’ Photo by Martin Church.

Sycamore Bones with Cory Kinal, Andrew Massey, and Abigail Taylor performing original music.

Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams performing country music.

Nancy Posey will be emcee.

NC-based Sycamore Bones Just Keeps Creating

Trio bringing their own brand of music to annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is another installment in a series about the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – ‘Handmade & Heartfelt.’ A list of previous articles is below. The Showcase is scheduled for Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

Sycamore Bones vertical

Sycamore Bones on stage. From left, Abigail Taylor, Cory Kinal and Andrew Massey.

LENOIR, N.C. – A few years ago, Andrew Massey was desperate. He wanted someone to play music with. His wife, Anna, was encouraging him to find more outlets to play the music he was beginning to write and sing. Finding a partner, though, isn’t easy. Especially when one is new to the community; breaking into a tight-knit musical scene isn’t always easy.

So, he put an ad on Craig’s List. Cory Kinal saw it, reached out to Andrew, and they’ve been playing together since. In short, even though Massey jokes the arrangement is “no strings attached,” he acknowledged, “We started jamming together and I went and bought an upright bass in South Carolina so we could start an acoustic band.”

That they did. Through a series of discussions, they settled on the name Sycamore Bones. In order to focus on those acoustic roots, the band recently added Abigail Taylor.

Massey, a vocalist who plays bass, is straightforward in his description of the band’s focus. “I would describe us as an Americana band, which is just a fancy way of saying that we take our style from a lot of different types of American roots music – Country, Blues, Bluegrass, Rock & Roll. We even like to believe there is a little bit of Punk rock in there somewhere.”

Kinal’s description is a bit more nuanced. “It’s hard to say what kind of music we play, we combine so many genres that its easiest to just call it ‘Americana,’ but I feel like that’s such a broad term. We play folk, Alt-country, bluegrassy, foot-stompin’ old-time. We play a little of everything everyone would like – or we hope they do.”

Kinal plays guitar, sings lead and, in his words, “sings sweet, sweet harmonies to the beautiful voices of my fellow bones.”

Kinal added that the band truly is hard to define. “It’s hard to describe the music of a band who plays a song about a newlywed couple promising each other everything in life then dying in a train crash, and then follows that with an uplifting song about not letting life’s worries and problems get you down.” He explained, “It’s like we’re working in unison to even each other out; it’s nice to sing some harmony on a song of happiness, when you’ve just sung a song of hard times and sorrow.”

sycamore-bones-1-bw

Cory Kinal (left) and Andrew Massey are the founding members of Sycamore Bones.

The purpose of the band’s music is clear, insisted Kinal, even if it is complex. “I hope our music exemplifies life, maybe not at its greatest, but at its deepest.” That’s why he said he doesn’t have a favorite song from their repertoire. “It changes daily or maybe weekly. I love seeing someone in the audience really get into a song. It gives me even more of a connection with the lyrics I’m singing.” He added, though,  “I’d say right this very minute my favorite song is ‘Saint Sophia.’ On the outside it’s about Saint Sophia and her three daughters, Faith, Hope and Charity who met horrific fates, but really I use their story to portray different aspects of my life, my own thoughts of faith, hope, love and charity.”

Taylor has been friends with Massey and Kinal for a few years now. She shared, “Andrew and Cory are a great mixture. Cory’s this poetic northerner and Andrew’s a heart-on-his-sleeve southerner. You’ve got kind of a gothic Country/Americana from Cory’s side and a wailing rockabilly from Andrew’s side.” She added, “I tie the two sides together with bluesy harmonies, and the occasional tambourine.”

Massey added, “We all love so many different types of music so to narrow down influences is a little hard. I know John Prine and Bob Dylan would be the first two guys I would mention. A few of my personal influences are also bands like Wilco, or the Clash and guys like Tom Waits.” He continued, “When I was 18 or 19 Bob Dylan blew my mind! This is probably the reason I picked up acoustic guitar and started writing songs. Something about those first few albums he had was like going to church for me. The simplicity and the faults in his voice, the way he used words really all connected with me.”

I’ve … been lucky enough to be surrounded by a huge amount of people that appreciate live music and support it every chance they can.” – Cory Kinal

Kinal explained why the moniker “Heartfelt” fits the music of Sycamore Bones as well as does the description, “Handmade.” He shared, “Everything, every style, every song is played with pure emotion. My influences are from punk to bluegrass and every branch of music connected to both of them. I’m proud to be surrounded by talented musicians and have been my entire life. But it’s not just the musicians that have been the greatest influences on why I play the music I do. I’ve also been lucky enough to be surrounded by a huge amount of people that appreciate live music and support it every chance they can. Without my family and my friends, I wouldn’t have had the courage or talent to start a band that plays mostly original music.”

Showcase SC&D

Strictly Clean and Decent (Kay Crouch, Patrick Crouch, and Ron Shuffler, r) are hosting their 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Still, the enjoyment of writing and playing original music is essential for Sycamore Bones. As Kinal shared, “I want to experience a relationship with every song we play and every audience that listens. There’s a certain feeling you get when you play an original song and you see people really connecting to it. I want people to have fun, to listen to the lyrics, the music, and really get as much joy out of our performance as we do.”

Taylor’s influences were somewhat different. “I grew up on Rhythm & Blues and Jazz; I didn’t start listening or playing the kind of music we’re playing until I went to college in Western North Carolina, where it’s everywhere! My singing style is still heavily influenced by R&B and Jazz singers. But I like to think it adds something just a little different to the guys’ sound.”

Each of the band members expressed confidence in Caldwell County’s future because of the Showcase, and spoke also of the privilege of performing in it.

Massey said, “I just want to thank anyone in the community who creates music, art, or owns a small business. It’s these people that make us who we are as a community and create a culture that we can take pride in. Keep creating!”

Taylor noted, “The showcase is a yearly staple of Caldwell County. So it’s just exciting to be a part of that tradition, and to also be a part of an event that people of all ages come to experience. We hope it remains a yearly tradition and that it continues to grow.”

Kinal continued, “We were all super excited to be asked to play the Showcase. I remember Massey saying that we’ve kind of ‘made it’ in Caldwell when Patrick and Kay ask you to play alongside the county’s best musicians. It means everything to us that they would like our music and performance enough to ask us to be part of their lineup.” He added, “Caldwell County’s story is so similar to my rust belt upbringing, so close to where I grew up that it has the same feeling for me as a town 500 miles away that influences many of my lyrics.”

Massey said the Showcase is critical to the community because, “Music keeps life worth living. It’s exciting when a whole community gets together to support that cause.” Taylor simply added, “I second what Andrew said.”

Massey concluded, “I think the goal for all of us is that people connect with lyrics of the songs. We all want people to feel what we sing and the words we write. I think that may be the most gratifying part of performing.” 

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017. 

The Lenoir voice on Facebook

On Twitter: @lenoirvoice

Previous 2017 Showcase Articles

Handmade & Heartfelt: Theme of 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase inspired by area musicians

Jimmie Griffith Exemplifies Showcase Theme: Music is handmade in Caldwell County and is heartfelt from his native Brazil

Nancy Posey Bringing Her Humor and Wit to Showcase: Calls her role as emcee a mere ‘footnote’ to the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition: Boone-based group brings energy, excellence and creativity to Showcase

showcase-handmade-heartfelt-logo

Showcase Information and Performers

The 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase will be on Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center. Purchase tickets here from the Civic Center.

 This year’s concert will include eight groups or individuals. The total of musicians performing will be around two dozen, in addition to JAM members.

Strictly Clean and Decent with Kay and Patrick Crouch and Ron Shuffler.

Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Ridgeline: A bluegrass band featuring Jim Matheson on guitar, Mike Nelson on banjo, Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Larry Wright on bass, and Jimmy Houston on guitar.

MaisCeu featuring multi-instrumentalist Jimmie Griffith performing Brazilian music.

Max Waters playing Southern gospel, jazz, and blues piano.

Strictly Strings performing old time and contemporary string band music.  The band is Kathleen Burnett on fiddle and guitar, Anissa Burnett on bass and fiddle, Willow Dillon on banjo, fiddle, bass, and cello, Caleb Coatney on mandolin, banjo, and guitar, and Cecil Gurganus on guitar, fiddle, and bass.

Sycamore Bones with Cory Kinal, Andrew Massey, and Abigail Taylor performing original music.

Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams performing country music.

Nancy Posey will be emcee.

 Editor’s note: Abigail Taylor is also co-owner of The Lenoir Voice.