Category Archives: Communities

Gathering ‘Round the Open Mic

Wednesday night at Liquid Roots about building community

By Michael M. Barrick lenoirvoice@gmail.com

LENOIR, N.C. – Since the first European settlers put down roots in Lenoir and other areas of Caldwell County, music has been part of daily life. Neighbors have, do and will continue to gather on front porches with string instruments handed down through the generations.

However, musicians have always also been part of the community’s arts scene. With the opening of the Liquid Roots Brewing Project at 1048 Harper Ave. NW in Lenoir, a vibrant new venue has been established for this rich tradition to grow.

The Benson, a jazz/rock duo from Western North Carolina – consisting of A.J. Herrick and Daniel Reece – host the Wednesday evening open mic. Herrick is excited about the brewery’s future. “I recently moved from Houston where I was performing in the Houston music scene for four years. Having been away from North Carolina, I grew to miss my home and am now beyond excited to be able to do what I love in the state that I love, specifically Lenoir.” He continued, “I do have a vision and so do the other local musicians in Lenoir, and we want to help grow Lenoir through our music, and bring folks in. Since being back, I have a huge passion for seeing the potential that Lenoir has become a reality.”

He continued, “The open mic is a platform that Daniel and I are very fortunate to have, and we want to use it to bring in more talent from all over. We also encourage all age groups and all types of art, whether music, poetry, storytelling, comedy, etc. We just want people to come together and make the arts in general and build a community.”

It seems to be working. Below are photos from some of the musicians that were at last week’s open mic. At least one other person took time for story-telling.

The Benson open the evening with a short set, then open the mic to others.

A.J. plays.

Daniel demonstrates his intensity.

Dwight McGlynn plays one of his original tunes.

William Ritter, self-taught on the fiddle, came in from Patterson for the fun.

Patrick Crouch, seemingly everywhere, dropped by to share a tune or two.

The open mic is every Wednesday from 7 – 10 p.m.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2019. Note: This is part 2 of a 2-part story. Part 1, a feature about the owners of Liquid Roots Brewing Project, can be read here.

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Choosing Lenoir

Indiana natives find Lenoir ‘A Very Welcoming Town,’ move here, and establish Liquid Roots Brewing Project

By Michael M. Barrick lenoirvoice@gmail.com

LENOIR, N.C. – During the summers of 2002 and 2003, Taylor Brummett, then a college student, drove the Blue Ridge Parkway. He immediately fell in love with the North Carolina mountains and resolved then to someday settle somewhere along the Parkway in the Tar Heel State.

From left: Taylor and Katie Brummett; Jamie and Tommy Brubaker

It took a while, but Brummett has realized his dream. Taylor, along with his wife Katie, and Katie’s brother and sister-in-law, Tommy and Jamie Brubaker, moved to Lenoir late last year and opened Liquid Roots Brewing Project at 1048 Harper Ave. NW.

In a recent interview, the four Indiana natives cited Lenoir’s people, energy and natural beauty as reasons for choosing the town to raise their families and launch their business. Katie is 38, Taylor 37, Tommy 36, and Jamie 33.

While their Grand Opening is scheduled for March 30-31, the family business has already earned quite a following and has become a gathering spot to enjoy a great beer while listening to live music and the spoken word during Wednesday’s open mic night; listening to some of the region’s best musicians on Friday and Saturday night; playing family games on Tuesday evening; or, see what “Kick the Keg” specials are available on Thursday evenings. They’re closed on Sunday and Monday.

While they don’t serve food, there is a food truck – A Taste of Culture owned by Seth Nash – that is parked on their property on their busiest nights.

Sharing his thoughts about why the business is off to a solid start, Taylor said, “Life’s all about relationships. Lenoir’s people are awesome.”

Katie added, “With music, it’s been crazy. There are so many musicians.” Consequently, between booked acts on Friday and Saturday, and those that meander in on open mic night, there is a wide variety of music available for everyone. Virtually every form of American Roots music, as well as some world music, has already been heard on the small stage occupying a corner near the front door.

Taylor added, “There is an insane amount of talent here. That is something we are very proud to be part of.” He continued, “People are coming to us. The energy is building. The town has given us energy, and we are cycling it back out. We have already made lots of friends.”

Jamie echoed that sentiment, sharing, “In three months of living here we made more friends than while living in Tennessee for two years.” Tommy added, “You can’t go anywhere without running into people you know.” Taylor summarized, “Lenoir is a very welcoming town. Everybody’s been welcoming.”

Still, the decision to choose Lenoir was not inevitable. Every attempt at starting a business in Indiana fell through for one reason or another shared Taylor. “So, I started hunting around on the internet for towns along the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina.” After watching a UNC-TV program featuring nationally acclaimed Lenoir-based folk artist Charlie Frye and seeing how close Lenoir is to the Blue Ridge Parkway, they decided a visit to Lenoir was in order.

Taylor said, “We were trying to decide if Lenoir was a place we’d want to live and raise our children.” The first day they visited was a Sunday. “We thought no one lived here. Then we learned that Lenoir is just quiet on Sunday,” recalled Taylor. So, they hung around, visited local businesses and attractions during the week. Impressed by Lenoir’s energy and welcoming people – and a suitable location – they made an offer on the building they now occupy and moved their families here.

It wasn’t a tough call. Jamie shared, “We all love the mountains. We’re all small-town people too. It just works.”

As much as there is to enjoy in and around Lenoir, right now they’re all a bit busy, as the Liquid Roots Brewing Project is an “all hands on deck” endeavor.

Taylor Brummett

Taylor is the brewer, or the “beer nerd.” He shared, “I’ve been a jack of all trades. But brewing is the rabbit hole I went down. I like making things from scratch and things that people enjoy.” He first tried brewing about 15 years ago, set it aside for a season, then picked it back up about 6 years ago and has consistently worked on learning the trade. Though he is self-taught, he credited a brewery in Sparta, Tenn. with allowing him to learn all he could from them. Jamie said, “We call him a mad scientist.” Tommy added, “Taylor’s beer is so good, it would be crazy not to do it.”

Katie handles special events, marketing, music, office duties and whatever else is required. Most recently a stay-at-home mom, she said adjusting to a busy business has been a challenge.

Jamie, a nurse in a local hospital, says, “I just show up and say I’m here. What project needs my work?”

Tommy is the self-described utility man. Technically the bar manager, he shared, “Anything I can do to get Taylor’s beer off and running is what I’m all about.” Katie, nodding towards Tommy, said, “Look at that face. That’s the face you want behind a bar.” Jamie added, “He never gets angry.”

Tommy Brubaker

The business, said Taylor, “Allows us to express who we are. There is energy and community built into the brewery scene. It’s a legitimate gathering spot for the people in Lenoir to enjoy.” He noted that they are fortunate to be able to build on what is already here. He said, “We want to supplement what’s here.”

Katie called it an extension of home and Tommy said that, “It’s cool to see people establish friendships over beer and conversation.”

Though they started the business to brew their own beer, they have started out as a taproom while they were awaiting all the appropriate licenses, which they’ve gotten. Taylor said, of the business name, “One of our friends suggested we not use the name because it sounds like we’re not finished. Well, we’re not. We’re always growing.”

Indeed, though they had a soft opening getting to know the community, their Grand Opening is scheduled for March 30-31. Several food trucks and bands are scheduled for the two-day event. Their families will also be in town to help.

First, though, a St. Patrick’s Day celebration will be held this Saturday, March 16. Mark Galleshaw will be performing traditional Irish music, and J.J. Hipps and Darren Bryant will also be performing. There will also be a foot truck rodeo with three food trucks.

Opening as a taproom has proven beneficial, shared Jamie, “We are getting to know the beer that people enjoy. There are a lot of craft beer fans.” Taylor added that the knowledge they’ve gained will help them in the transition of replacing some of the guest taps with their own brews.

So, while they still have a way to go, they are also pleased with where they are. “We’ve heard it’s a lot like Cheers, and that’s exactly what we want to hear. We want it to be like sitting around the kitchen table,” said Jamie.

Want to know more?

To learn more about Liquid Roots Brewing Company, visit them on Facebook, email liquidrootsbrewing@gmail.com, or call 828-572-1106.

Note: This is part 1 of a 2-part article. Part 2, about Open Mic night at Liquid Roots, will be published tomorrow.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2019.

American Roots Music the Focus of ‘From the Hollows to the Honky-Tonks’

Influences, interests and ages of musicians vary; dedication to the craft does not

Note: This article is the third in a series about the 21st Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, coming up on Sat., March 9. Read the first two here. – MMB lenoirvoice@gmail.com

LENOIR, N.C. – The 21st Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – “From the Hollows to the Honky-Tonks,” – will cover the spectrum of Americana music, with the influences, interests and ages of the musicians varying tremendously. What is most significant, however, is what they share in common – an exceptional dedication to the art and craft of writing, playing and singing music.

Founders and hosts of the Showcase, Strictly Clean and Decent, is a local band made up of Kay Crouch, Patrick Crouch, and Ron Shuffler. The Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase has included over 200 local performers throughout its history. Patrick shared, “The goal of the showcase is to promote local live music and increase awareness of live music as an important cultural resource.”

Strictly Clean and Decent will welcome to the stage Blackberry Jam, Will Knight, Home Brewed, Opal Moon, J.J. Hipps, Andy and Gary Trivette, and Hannah Grace. “They will be performing American roots music that is sure to get your toes tapping and your heartstrings stretching,” added Crouch, who provided the following information about the musicians.

Blackberry Jam is a six-piece band sponsored by the Caldwell Arts Council’s Junior Appalachian Musicians (JAM) program. The band, Blackberry JAM, was formed out of the need to provide a performance outlet for talented members of the Caldwell JAM program. Ranging in age from 11 to 18 years, band members are:  brothers Dawson and Lincoln Clark; brother and sister Dalton and Averi Sigmon; Kymdyn Clement; and, Gideon White. Crouch shared, “The band has quickly gained experience performing at a variety of events, festivals, and venues over the past two years. While rooted in the rich musical traditions of our area, the musicians are open to many musical influences. We know you will enjoy Blackberry JAM-The future of tradition.”

Will Knight will be performing on the show as a special guest of Strictly Clean and Decent. Will’s grandparents played country music and his earliest childhood memories are of evenings spent listening to his grandfather playing bass and singing lead while his grandmother played guitar and sang harmony. Will studied piano at an early age and continued his studies with Ron Sinclair at St. Luke’s Methodist Church, Patrick Crouch at Granite Falls Middle School, Arden Carson at South Caldwell High, Rick Cline at Lenoir-Rhyne Percussion, and East Tennessee State University. He studied guitar with Reggie Harris and Andy Page. Will studied dobro with Jaret Carter and is obsessed with the 5-string banjo thanks to Bela Fleck. He worked for six months in the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama in Glasgow, Scotland and has performed in Scotland, England, Wales, and Brazil. We welcome Will back to his hometown stage.

Home Brewed is trio featuring Laura Brewer on bass and vocals, Matt Brewer on guitar and vocals, and Wade Parker on banjo. Matt and Laura began performing in local venues about seven years ago and recently added Wade Parker to the group. Home Brewed performs for private events, 1841 Café, Lenoir Moose Lodge, Fyreside Bottles and Brews, and Granite Falls Brewery. They play a wide variety of music. While they are not a traditional bluegrass band, they put the banjo to rock-n-roll creating a unique sound. Home Brewed plays anything from Led Zeppelin to Patsy Cline, to the Rolling Stones and even Blue Oyster Cult!

Opal Moon is a local musician who plays guitar and sings straight from the heart. She does amazing versions of cover songs and she often performs original music on local songwriter nights. She is steeped in blues, soul, and rock traditions. Opal performs acoustic and electric music. You may hear her performing solo, as a duo with Anthony Pescatore, or with her band Opal Moon and the Dark Sides. She is appearing as a special guest of Strictly Clean and Decent.

J. J. Hipps plays the blues. J.J. performs as a three-piece power trio featuring J.J. on guitar and vocals, the legendary Mark “Bump” Bumgarner on bass, and Ben Pannenbacker on drums. Crouch said, “All you have to do is close your eyes when you hear this music and you will be transported to a different place. It’s a place where the elevation is lower, and the water is higher. It’s a place where they don’t complain about the heat, they call it sultry. But that ain’t all. Through the miracle of modern technology and a Stratocaster guitar, J.J. has not only carries the torch for Delta blues; he takes us to Memphis, Chicago, Muscle Shoals, and Detroit. Yes indeed, Jacob Johnson Hipps plays the blues.”

Andy Trivette is a multi-instrumentalist who has lived in Caldwell County for sixteen years and is a welcome addition to the local music scene. Andy was born in Watauga County the youngest of 11 children, 2 boys and 9 girls, into a very musical family. Andy’s dad played in several bluegrass bands Andy learned to play whatever instruments were laying around; mainly guitar, bass, dobro, and mandolin. Andy has played in several bands over the years most recently he has been playing solo gigs at family venues. Andy will be bringing his telecaster and his brother Gary Trivette will be playing bass as special guests of Strictly Clean and Decent. We are looking forward to hearing these boys “twang it up.”

Hannah Grace is well known in our area. She has amazing stage presence and authentic vocals. The essence of her music cannot be learned, it must be lived. Hannah grew up in our local music scene as part of musical family. Her roots are evident in her sound. She will be performing her brand of country music assisted by David Shumate on guitar, Paul Shumate on drums, Reath Jackson on guitar and vocals, and Randy Matheson on bass.

Nancy Posey will again serve as emcee. Crouch remarked, “Nancy is a high-powered poet, picker, prophet, and preacher who supports live art near and far. We are pleased to have her back!”

Learn More

Patrons of the show may choose to include dinner at 5:30 for an additional $15.  Reservations must be placed in advance. Entrees include a choice of roast pork or NC trout.

Tickets for the showcase are $11 and student and child tickets are available.  To purchase tickets, call the box office at 726-2407 or visit the website of the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

© Michael Mathers Barrick, 2019. Photos of Ron Shuffler and Nancy Posey courtesy photos.

Transition Time

Expanding how I tell Appalachia’s story

At the beginning of 2019, I wrote that I would no longer be doing news reporting. I did warn, however, that I might be back.

Well, I am. To learn what I’m doing now to tell Appalachia’s story, visit the Art, Hillbilly Highway and Hillbilly Highway Chapter pages.

It is my intention to be far down the road of the transition by March 1. In fact, I’ve already begun by the addition of the art page. You can read more below. In any event, I’ve concluded it is time to transition to telling Appalachia’s story through Folk Art, storytelling, poetry and more. Of course, I will write about others doing it, including naturally the incredibly talented musicians that populate Caldwell County, Western North Carolina, and all of Southern and Central Appalachia.

To learn more about my workshops: “Community of Writers” and “Gathering a Family History,” or my story-telling and poetry reading, please contact me at lenoirvoice@gmail.com.

Now, about that art:

The Hillbilly Highway

The Hillbilly Highway

The word “hillbilly” is often used in less than flattering terms. However, as a West Virginia native and life-long Appalachian resident, I consider the Hillbilly as Hero.

To many, the term “Hillbilly Highway” refers to the roads Appalachians once used to leave for the industrial north and now the Sunbelt, looking for work. I, however, takes another view. Born and raised in the heart of the Mountain State, I have traveled tens of thousands of miles along the back roads of Central and Southern Appalachia chronicling the history and stories of Appalachia. This informs my view as the Hillbilly as heroic.

Try traveling it for yourself! Doing so will allow you to slow down, see some of the oldest and most beautiful forests in the world, and make some new friends.

© Michael Mathers Barrick, 2019

Music along the Hillbilly Highway is ‘Handmade & Heartfelt’

Kay and Patrick Crouch have taught and inspired thousands of students and others in the region; they are also premier promoters of the music of Caldwell County and Southern Appalachia

By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is the sixth installment from “The Hillbilly Highway, Volume 2: Seeds, Songs and Streams.” It is an abridged version of an article originally published in 2017.  Learn more here.

6 Showcase Grand Finale

The Grand Finale of a Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

LENOIR, N.C. – Before we ride the Hillbilly Highway out of Caldwell County for now, our first leg of our tour along the Hillbilly Highway would be incomplete without first acknowledging a couple that have worked tirelessly to preserve and pass along Appalachia’s musical heritage – from Blues to Bluegrass and everything in between.

Handmade & Heartfelt

When I interviewed Kay and Patrick Crouch in 2017, just a few of weeks before the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, they were relaxed – the kind of relaxed that is rooted in two decades of experience – as they discussed preparations for the concert during a visit to their home studio. (The 20th Annual Showcase was held in 2018, and the 21st is already scheduled for March 9, 2019).

Patrick explained the genesis of the theme for 2017, “Handmade & Heartfelt.” He said, “Some years I have the title in my brain and then get the musicians that fit. This year, however, I had this group of people who I love and admire as people and musicians that I’ve been wanting to get on the show. So, it will feature various styles of music – some is original, but all comes from the heart.”

Everybody truly loves music. It is the universal language … .” – Patrick Crouch

The 19th Showcase included eight groups or individuals, including Strictly Clean and Decent, which is Patrick and Kay’s collaboration with Ron Shuffler. The total of musicians performing was about two dozen, in addition to members of the Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Pointing out that 19 years of experience of preparing and hosting the showcase has made it easier for them, Patrick shared, “Now we have a tradition established. I already know what we’re going to do for the 20th.”

Showcase SC&D

Strictly Clean and Decent (Kay Crouch, Patrick Crouch, and Ron Shuffler) host the Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Patrick and Kay acknowledged that not every one of the more than 200 musicians that have appeared in the showcase as of this year are Caldwell County residents, but all have roots to the county. “It’s the traditional music that’s the connection,” offered Kay. She continued, “It’s good to connect with folks from outside Caldwell County. The real value is that these folks see what we’re so proud of.”

Patrick shared, “It is unfathomable to think that more than 200 musicians who live in or have ties to Caldwell County have performed. Our goal was 100. After 10 years, we had reached 128. When we started this, this was our stage that we wanted to share. It is incredible to think about how many musicians we have shared that stage with.” Smiling, and looking at Kay, he added, “It’s just the tip of the iceberg. We have such a community of musicians here. It’s going to just keep growing.”

He continued, “Music flows. It flows from the performer. It’s not something you think about. It’s what we do. The sign of an artist is playing whatever they want.”

Patrick Crouch by David Cortner

Musician Patrick Crouch of Lenoir, N.C. always takes plenty of time to share a story or two about the history and music of Appalachia © David Courtner

That’s exactly what happens at the Showcase. Patrick sends out a schedule to the musicians, tells them how much time they have and how many songs they can play, but does not tell them what to play. He explained why. “Everybody truly loves music. It is the universal language. The audience knows that. The biggest challenge is for the musicians to limit their selections.” He continued, “I don’t give a lot of direction. Early on, we met a lot. Now it’s better to just let things be as they may.”

Besides the quality of musicians that play at the Showcase, Patrick says another reason for its success is how the community of musicians support it. “Those who don’t play in it still come out. Some come during sound check just to see folks they haven’t seen in a while. And, of course, we’ve enjoyed the support of the people of Caldwell County from the beginning.”

Sitting in a room surrounded by CDs, musical memorabilia, instruments and a recording studio, Patrick sat up in his chair and shared, “I stick my chest out when I say I’m from Caldwell County and am talking about our music.”

© Michael M. Barrick, 2017-2018.

 

Towering Mountains and Church Steeples along the Hillbilly Highway

The Grandfather of mountains affords mile-high stunning views

 Note: This is the second installment from “The Hillbilly Highway, Volume 2: Seeds, Songs and Streams.”  Learn more here. 

By Michael M. Barrick

2 Grandfather Mtn bridge and steeple

FOSCOE, N.C. – Towering mountains and church steeples are common sites in Appalachia. Not so common are swinging bridges that are a mile high. But there it is on the far left – The Mile-High Swinging Bridge on Grandfather Mountain in North Carolina. Seen here from N.C. Rt. 105 in Watauga County, the bridge was built in 1952 and renovated in 1999.

Winds of more than 100 miles an hour and temperatures below zero have been recorded there. Not far further up the road, one can see the famous “profile view” that gives the mountain its name – the appearance of a Grandpa – beard and all, reclining. Its peak is the intersection of Avery, Caldwell and Watauga counties. Indeed, Caldwell County, where we live, has the greatest rise in elevation among the state’s 100 counties, from roughly 1,000 feet to just under 6,000 feet. Its peak is the banner on The Lenoir Voice. 

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018

 

Asheville Catholic Vicariate Issues Statement in Support of Immigrants

‘We Are Strangers No Longer’ asserts that Gospel requires that immigrants be welcomed

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – The Asheville Vicariate Council of the Catholic Diocese of Charlotte has issued a Pastoral Statement in support of immigrants. The document, “We Are Strangers No Longer,” follows below. (El Consejo del Vicariato de Asheville de la Diócesis Católica de Charlotte ha emitido una Declaración Pastoral en apoyo de los inmigrantes abajo).

In our first pastoral statement over eleven years ago, WELCOMING THE STRANGER, we invited our Catholic community to welcome the newest immigrants to our Asheville area. At that time we were responding to widespread panic within the immigrant community when a number of people were detained and deported. We joined with the bishops of our country in calling for a comprehensive reform of a broken immigration system. In the ensuing eleven years, our Catholic community generously welcomed our newest brothers and sisters.  Today, immigrants are no longer strangers, but an essential part of our faith communities. Unfortunately, the broken immigration system of eleven years ago has all but collapsed. Today, the conditions faced by immigrants have considerably worsened.

Where our brothers and sisters suffer rejection and abandonment we will lift our voice on their behalf. We will welcome them and receive them. They are Jesus and the Church will not turn away from Him . . . .

Our immigrant brothers and sisters have called on us to respond once more to the panic in which they and their children live. They never know when their families will be torn apart. Children, many of whom are citizens of our country, live in constant fear that their parents may never return home from work. Parents worry that their children, who have received protection under the DACA program (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), may be permanently separated from their families and deported.  The threat against families is real. The fear is intolerable. After eleven years of failed attempts to reform our laws concerning immigration, families and children are still living in fear.

This situation is happening to our immigrant brothers and sisters here and now. They are our parishioners and have shared with us their rich traditions of faith and family. They make a positive contribution to the life of the Church, the community and the economy. In response to the Executive Order on Refugees this past January, 2017, the president and vice-president of the national conference of Catholic bishops stated:

The Lord Jesus fled the tyranny of Herod, was falsely accused and then deserted by his friends. He had nowhere to lay His head (Lk 9:58). Welcoming the stranger and those in flight is not one option among many in the Christian life. It is the very form of Christianity itself. Our actions must remind people of Jesus. The actions of our government must remind people of basic humanity. Where our brothers and sisters suffer rejection and abandonment we will lift our voice on their behalf. We will welcome them and receive them. They are Jesus and the Church will not turn away from Him . . . . Our desire is not to enter the political arena, but rather to proclaim Christ alive in the world today. In the very moment a family abandons their home under threat of death, Jesus is present.  And He says to each of us, “whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me” (Mt 25:40).

(Joint Statement, USCCB, 30 January 2017)

And as Pope Francis continually reminds the Church, “the face of each person bears the mark of the face of Christ!”  And he adds:

“Migrants and refugees are not pawns on the chessboard of humanity. ”

(Message for World Day of Migrants and Refugees, 2014)

Through the centuries, people have looked to the Church as a sanctuary where people may turn for help and protection in time of need. As immigrants today look to us for spiritual support in this time of crisis for their families, we are united in calling on our Catholic community and all people of good will to stand with immigrants and their children. We invite Catholic Charities and our area Catholic schools and Faith Formation programs to be especially mindful of the needs of children who are living in fear. We encourage our parishes to respond with generosity to immigrants especially those have been detained and separated from their children and loved ones. And we commit ourselves as Catholic leaders to continue to work and pray for the comprehensive reform of the immigration laws that will keep families united and allow all immigrants to know their dignity as children of God. May our Church always be a sanctuary where no one is a stranger!

Immigrants are great.jpg

Asheville Vicariate Council

Very Rev. Wilbur N. Thomas, Vicar Forane, Rector/Pastor

Basilica of St. Lawrence, Asheville

Rev. C. Morris Boyd, Parochial Vicar

Basilica of St. Lawrence, Asheville

Rev. Patrick Cahill, Pastor

St. Eugene Church, Asheville

Mr. Juan Antonio Garcia, Coordinator

Asheville Vicariate Hispanic Ministry

Mr. Nicholas Haskell, Coordinator

Poverty & Justice Education, Diocese of Charlotte

Rev. Douglas May, Maryknoll Missioner

In-Residence, St. Eugene Church, Asheville

Rev. Shawn O’Neal, Pastor

Sacred Heart Church, Brevard

Rev. John Pagel, Priest-at-Large to Hispanic Community

Hendersonville

Rev. Roberto Perez, O.F.M. Cap., Parochial Vicar

Immaculate Conception, Hendersonville

Mr. Robert Phillips, Representative, Catholic Charities-Western Office

Diocese of Charlotte, Asheville

Rev. Adrian Porras, Pastor

St. Barnabas Church, Arden

Rev. Martin Schratz, O.F.M. Cap., Pastor

Immaculate Conception, Hendersonville  

Sr. Peggy Verstege, R.S.M., Hispanic Ministry

Sacred Heart Church, Burnsville

Sr. Maria Goretti Weldon, R.S.M., Director of Mission and Values

Sisters of Mercy Services Corporation, Asheville

Rev. Fred Werth, Pastor

St. Andrew Church, Mars Hill

Rev. Dr. Michael Zboyovski, Deacon

St. Eugene Church, Asheville

 

Ya No Somos Extranjeros:

Declaración Pastoral del Consejo del Vicariato de Asheville de la Diócesis de Charlotte, 2017

En nuestra primera declaración hace once años, ACOGIENDO AL FORASTERO ENTRE NOSOTROS, invitamos a nuestra comunidad Católica a dar la bienvenida a los nuevos inmigrantes de Asheville.  En aquella época estábamos respondiendo a un pánico universal de la comunidad inmigrante en lo cual muchos estaban detenidos y deportados.  Al mismo tiempo, nos juntamos con los obispos católicos de nuestro país llamando por una reforma completa del sistema quebrantado de inmigración.  En los once años después, nuestra comunidad católica generosamente acogió a los nuevos hermanos y hermanas.  Hoy en día, los inmigrantes ya no son extranjeros, pero forman una parte esencial de nuestras comunidades de fe.  Desafortunadamente, el sistema quebrantado de inmigración de once años atrás ya casi colapsó.  Ahora, la situación de los inmigrantes está mucho peor.

Nuestros hermanas y hermanos inmigrantes nos pidieron a responder una vez más al pánico en lo cual viven ellos y sus hijos.  No saben cuando sus familias van a ser destrozados.  Los niños, muchos que son ciudadanos viven en el miedo que sus padres van a regresar a casa después del trabajo.  Los padres están preocupados que sus hijos, que tiene protección por medio del programa de DACA (Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia), van a ser separados permanentemente de sus familias y deportados.  La amenaza contra familias es real.  El miedo es intolerable.  Después de once años de intentos fracasados de reformar nuestras leyes de inmigración, familias y sus hijos sigen viviendo en miedo.

Nuestros hermanas y hermanos inmigrantes están pasando esta situación aquí y ahora.  Ellos son nuestros filigreses y nos han compartido sus valiosas tradiciones de fe y familia.  Hacen una contribución positiva a la vida de la Iglesia, la comunidad y la economía.  Respondiendo a la Orden Ejecutiva de enero de 2017, el presidente y el vice-presidente de la conferencia nacional de obispos católicos declararon:

El Señor Jesús huyó de la tiranía de Herodes, fue falsamente acusado y luego abandonado por sus amigos. No tenía dónde reclinar su cabeza (Lc 9:58). Acoger al extranjero y a los que están huyendo no es una opción entre muchas en la vida cristiana. Es la forma misma del cristianismo en sí. Nuestras acciones deben hacer que la gente recuerde a Jesús. Las acciones de nuestro gobierno deben hacer que la gente recuerde la humanidad básica. Cuando nuestros hermanos y hermanas sufran rechazo y abandono, nosotros elevaremos nuestra voz en su favor. Los acogeremos y los recibiremos. Ellos son Jesús, y la Iglesia no se apartará de Él . . . . Nuestro deseo no es entrar en el terreno político, sino anunciar a Cristo vivo en el mundo de hoy. En el momento mismo en que una familia abandona su hogar bajo amenaza de muerte, Jesús está presente. Y Él nos dice a cada uno de nosotros: “todo lo que hicieron por uno de estos mis hermanos más pequeños, lo hicieron por mí” (Mt 25:40).

Y como el Papa Francisco siempre dice a la Iglesia, “en el rostro de cada persona está impreso el rostro de Cristo.”  Y el papa añade:

Emigrantes y refugiados no son peones sobre el tablero de la humanidad.

(Mensaje Para La Jornada Mundial Del Emigrante Y Del Refugiado 2014)

Através de los siglos, la gente ha visto a la Iglesia como santuario donde busquen ayuda y protección en tiempos difíciles.  Pues, como los inmigrantes de hoy nos piden apoyo espiritual en estos tiempos difíciles para sus familias, estamos unidos en llamando a nuestra comunidad católica y a todo el pueblo de buena voluntad a mantenerse a lado de los inmigrantes y sus hijos.  Invitamos a Catholic Charities y las escuelas católicas de nuestra área y los programas de catequesis a tener en cuenta las necesidades de los niños que viven en el miedo.  Al mismo tiempo, animamos a nuestras parroquias a responder con generosidad a los inmigrantes especialmente a los que han sido detenidos y separados de sus niños y seres queridos.  Y nos comprometemos a luchar y rezar por la reforma completa de las leyes de inmigración para mantener familias unidas y permitir que todos los inmigrantes realicen su dignidad como Hijos de Dios.  ¡Qué nuestra Iglesia sea siempre un santuario en donde nadie es extranjero!

Applying Scripture in Our Communities

It may not mean what you think

By Alan M. Eddington and Michael M. Barrick

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Biblical literalists wishing to impose their will upon the rest of Americans are faced with a conundrum – the words that are in the Bible.

So, before you start waving the Christian flag and demand that we become a “Christian nation,” consider this passage from Acts 2: 42-45:

They devoted themselves
to the teaching of the apostles and to the communal life,
to the breaking of bread and to the prayers.
Awe came upon everyone,
and many wonders and signs were done through the apostles.
All who believed were together and had all things in common;
they would sell their property and possessions
and divide them among all according to each one’s need.

How many U.S. Christians do you know who are willing to live communally? How many are willing to sell their stuff and divide the proceeds to those most in need?

Exactly. Applying scripture in our communities may not mean what you think.

So, think critically. Think for yourself.

Discover your soul and embrace its majesty. Then, use your critical thinking to guide your heart to a better world, a better neighbor, and a better you.

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017. The Appalachian Chronicle is a sister publication of The Lenoir Voice.

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Now I’m Seriously Peeved at Donald Trump

Mess with the Muppets, and you mess with my family

By Michael M. Barrick

Donald Trump’s determination to build the military-industrial complex and a stupid wall (that just ain’t gonna happen folks!) is so important that he must kill off Big Bird. Public Broadcasting, which is the home of “Sesame Street,” Big Bird, Kermit and their many ethnically and racially diverse family and friends, is targeted for elimination from the federal budget.

So, I’m seriously peeved. You mess with the Muppets and you mess with my family.

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And you don’t mess with my family ‘cause I’m from Wild, Wonderful, Almost Heaven, West-by-God-Virginia, and we are obligated to stand up for our children – and their friends.

Well, when our children were growing up, the Muppets were their only friends on television. There are a couple of reasons for that. First, we were poor; rumors of us having dozens of Chock full o’ Nuts cans buried in the back yard full of cash were simply unfounded. Our children discovered that to their disappointment only after they and their friends had spent a day digging up our yard to no avail, other than to aerate it for me. And, secondly, if we could have afforded cable, we wouldn’t have let them watch the crap on it anyway.

You see, the theory was that the airwaves belonged to the public. So, we could get a PBS station in rural, central West Virginia – and later, more urban North Carolina. Wherever we took our children to live or visit, we knew that this sound programming, full of nothing more than lovely parables about living with one another in harmony – and of course many great lessons in the humanities and sciences – was available.

Sesame_Street_sign.svgAnyway, our children – now 34 and 32 – managed to get through their early childhood by watching only – and learning from – the Muppets and the many lessons they learned on Sesame Street.

We did not miss a Muppet movie. It was from watching “The Muppets Take Manhattan” that we learned from the wise owner of a restaurant that “Peoples is peoples.” That simply profound statement of tolerance, understanding and ultimately acceptance is a critical life lesson, and that phrase – in the context of the plot – could be understood by a child.

Unfortunately, it isn’t understood by Donald Trump. I believe he suffers from arrested development and probably has the outlook of an eight-year-old that never benefited from watching “Sesame Street.”

So, as I said earlier, I’m seriously peeved. Unfortunately, short of writing letters and holding up signs in protest, the best chance we had to prevent this has passed. And for that, we can thank the Democratic National Committee (DNC), and in particular Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Shultz, who as DNC chair last year, did all she could to cheat Bernie Sanders out of the nomination. Since she was quite competent at her job, she and her compatriots among the Democratic Party’s shrinking (but wealthy) elite have ironically caused us to find ourselves at this point. For those thinking it’s unfair to pick on the DNC, I will simply note that it is that defensive, head-in-the-sand attitude that will ensure defeat in the next election cycle. By the way, I’m not a Democrat, so I’m not advocating; just stating the obvious.

So now, the Republicans are in control, doing exactly what they said they would do.

Pbs-logo-800How, then, do we respond? We do our best. We let our voices be heard in Washington. We can support our local PBS and/or NPR stations.

As you consider that and other options, a brief story from about 30 years ago will illustrate the importance of the Muppets to our family – and, truly, to our nation.

We were at the mall. That itself was rare. There was a store there that had something I needed, but I don’t recall the details. But what happened with my wife, Sarah, and our children is quite memorable.

You see, Sarah has a rare ability to mimic perfectly the voices of the Muppets. They told bed-time stories at our home. They had “conversations” with the children through the stuffed versions we had at the house (I still have a small 6”-tall figurine of Kermit as a journalist – in trench coat, pen and pad).

In any event, while waiting on me, they were just inside the entrance to a department store where there was a large Muppet display. To occupy their time, Sarah started bringing the Muppets to life through her various voices. In time, an audience had gathered, enjoying the show as much as Lindsay and Allyn, who gazed at their “talking” Muppet friends, enraptured.

When the time to rendezvous came, Sarah told the children it was time to go. They protested. “We don’t want to go! We want to keep talking to Big Bird!” Sarah insisted. “No, we must go. It’s time to meet Daddy.”

Their response was classic. “We don’t want to meet Daddy. He’s a meanie!” I still wonder what the others watching this show thought. Nevertheless, I dispute that assertion and claim that they didn’t quite know how to express their objections appropriately. (Though they keep saying that).

BigbirdnewversionI learned something very important that day. Do not get between Big Bird and my children. I had senselessly forgotten that the Muppets were part of our family. I learned my lesson that day though, and will always remember it.

So, Republicans, look out. Sesame Street might go through rough times for the next few years because of you. It might come to resemble Detroit even. In time, though, the family and friends of the Muppets will have the day. Why? Because we yearn for community far more than we desire war.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2017

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JAM: ‘Building Community One Tune at a Time’

Inspiring program is preserving music, history and communities of Appalachia

By Michael M. Barrick

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Strictly Strings. Photo by Martin Church.

LENOIR, N.C. – The Junior Appalachian Musicians (JAM) program says on its website “We’re building community one tune at a time.”

That’s a fact, as I saw it on display last night here at the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase. There, among many other great musicians, we saw and heard the group Strictly Strings, which was born out of the Boone, N.C. JAM affiliate. (Learn more here: Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition).

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Strictly Strings on stage. Photo by Lonnie Webster.

Below each photo are statements from JAM’s website. We hope these photos and insights will motivate you to click on the links above and learn more about this vital educational music program that is preserving the history, traditions and communities of Appalachia. If you have a chance to see Strictly Strings or any JAM shows of the roughly 40 affiliates in southern Appalachia, do it! You’ll see and hear history come alive. 

JAM at Merlefest

Members of Caldwell JAM at MerleFest 2016

We envision a world in which all children have the opportunity to experience community through the joy of participating in traditional mountain music together.”

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Strictly Strings as seen on the cover of their album, ‘High on a Mountain.’ Photo by Martin Church.

Our mission is to provide communities the tools and support they need to teach children to play and dance to traditional old time and bluegrass music.”

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Caldwell JAM musicians perform for North Carolina’s legislators on ARTS DAY

 

We believe that children who are actively engaged in traditional mountain music are more connected and better prepared to strengthen their communities for future generations.”

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Strictly Strings photo by Martin Church.

Read about Caldwell, N.C. JAM here. 

© Michael M. Barrick, 2017

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