Tag Archives: Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

‘A Good Roots Man’

J.J. Hipps working to stay true to the blues

Note: This article is the fifth in a series about the 21st Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, coming up on Sat., March 9. Read the first four here.– MMB lenoirvoice@gmail.com

LENOIR, N.C. – The 21st Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase set for this Saturday promises a wide range of American Roots music. The title for this year’s Showcase – “From the Hollows to the Honky-Tonks,” – reinforces that notion. And for the “Honky-Tonk” set, blues musician Jacob (J.J.) Hipps will do his best to provide that honky-tonk sound and feel, even as he remains true to the roots of the blues.

Founders and hosts of the Showcase, Strictly Clean and Decent, is a local band made up of Kay Crouch, Patrick Crouch, and Ron Shuffler.

Patrick Crouch, in explaining why he was pleased to have Hipps play this year, said simply, “He’s a good roots man.” A performer that says very little during his sets, his music does his talking, though he did agree to an interview recently to talk about playing in the Showcase and the direction he is hoping to take his music.

Shared Hipps, “Any musician takes a lot from what they love. For me, blues music is a tradition, so I don’t stray from it. It’s stealing small bits from other musicians, make it your own, but pay homage to them.”

Hipps performs as a three-piece trio featuring Hipps on guitar and vocals, Mark “Bump” Bumgarner on bass, and Ben Pannenbacker on drums. Crouch said, “All you have to do is close your eyes when you hear this music and you will be transported to a different place. It’s a place where the elevation is lower, and the water is higher. It’s a place where they don’t complain about the heat, they call it sultry. Yes indeed, Jacob Johnson Hipps plays the blues.”

His musical influences include the likely suspects, such as Stevie Ray Vaughn, Muddy Waters, Jimi Hendrix and others. However, his dad’s favorite band is Led Zeppelin. “My dad being a musician, he was into classic rock. Once I discovered their early music was blues, I locked into them. They played with raw emotion and were not conventional.”

Yet, he added, “My number one guy is Freddie King. I feel like he had it all – guitar playing, vocals, charisma and stage presence.”

Hipps credits his father with not only exposing him to music but encouraging him to take it up. “I started playing when I was 16. At the time, I had a group of friends. We did everything together.” Still, his dad wanted him to expand his horizons. “Dad taught me to play the drums, but I didn’t like it. So, dad bought me a guitar next.”

It was then that he discovered Led Zeppelin. “I’d try and impress dad with Led Zeppelin songs.” He added, “After a year, I took it seriously. I wanted to be as good as Jimmy Page.” He soon began practicing eight hours a day over a three-year period. He shared, “For me, guitar playing has always been soothing for me. It is therapeutic and helps deal with anxiety and depression.”

About the time he was 20, his dad started pushing him more, said Hipps. Soon, he was playing gigs. His dad played drums for about seven years with him.

Now, though, he is ready to move beyond covering the songs of others to writing his own. “I’ve always come up with things I’ve enjoyed. But you can go only so far playing cover music. I want to get out from behind that shield and be vulnerable. I don’t know exactly what is going to happen, but it’s time.”

The Showcase couldn’t be a better time. Hipps admits that he is working to brand himself through marketing. Ultimately though, he said, “I’ve got to write and play original material.” That, he said, is the best marketing.

“I’m very excited about playing in the Showcase. It’s an opportunity to get in front of local folks and others that haven’t heard me yet.” While he plays regularly at numerous locations an hour or two from Lenoir, he is excited about playing where the space is designed specifically for listening. “It’s a cool place.” While playing in honky-tonks pays the bills, they’re not the best place to be heard. Still, said Hipps, “The most important thing it to play out. So, I’m pleased to have those opportunities.”

Yet, he hopes there is more to come. He wants to record an album soon. “That’s the top of my list. It’s the only way I’m going to keep growing.”

Learn More

Patrons of the show may choose to include dinner at 5:30 for an additional $15.  Reservations must be placed in advance. Entrees include a choice of roast pork or NC trout.

Tickets for the showcase are $11 and student and child tickets are available.  To purchase tickets, call the box office at 726-2407 or visit the website of the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

© Michael Mathers Barrick, 2019. A note to readers: I am aware of formatting design errors in the posts being sent to your email. I’m working to resolve the problem.

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‘Keeping it Positive’ Through Music

A quarter century of learning from Kay and Patrick Crouch

Note: This article is the fourth in a series about the 21st Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, coming up on Sat., March 9. Read the first three here.– MMB lenoirvoice@gmail.com

LENOIR, N.C. – I first interviewed Patrick Crouch when he was teaching music at Granite Falls Middle School in southern Caldwell County.

It was 1995, perhaps 1996.

It was just the first of countless encounters with Patrick – and Kay, his bride and guide. Along with Ron Shuffler, they constitute Strictly Clean and Decent, hosts of the 21st Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase.

While they hadn’t yet started the Showcase the first time I met Patrick, it was clear that the seeds were already planted. That first interview – conducted in the library and band building – revealed a musician devoted to teaching and preserving the traditional music with which he grew up.

The interview, done for a local newspaper that I worked for then, was suggested by Patrick’s principal. I understood that the true stories about the schools in Caldwell County were not to be found at school board meetings; rather, they were – and are – to be found in the classrooms. So, I relished the opportunity.

Indeed, Patrick was such an easy fellow to interview, that the feature story made its way into my first book, “The Hillbilly Highway.” The chapter, titled, “An ‘Aural’ Tradition,” precedes a story about a then-student of his, Will Knight. Now, nearly a quarter century later, they’ll be taking the stage together Saturday night.

That’s what Kay and Patrick do. They teach; while Patrick was teaching at Granite Falls, Kay was running the music program at Caldwell Community College & Technical Institute for several years. They encourage, recognizing the best that each student or musician has to offer, but also expecting nothing less than their best. To accomplish the latter, they lead by example.

I am not a musician, but that doesn’t mean I don’t appreciate music. I enjoy it for several reasons, but primarily because it is the universal language of people. It elevates humanity. It is the spark that ignites the spirit of peace. Still, I acknowledged to Patrick that he was dealing with a non-musician. As I’ve come to know about both Patrick and Kay, they can relate to any person wanting to know about music. So that day – that first interview – began an ongoing quarter century of learning about music, in particularly the people who make and preserve it in Caldwell County.

And Patrick, I knew, was one of them during that first interview. He said, “Not only do we have a natural beauty, we have a cultural beauty that is very rare here.” He added, “I prefer to work on the basics. It’s a great position for me to be in to preserve musical traditions.” Indeed, the caption in the book under Patrick’s photo states, “Middle School teacher and bluegrass musician Patrick Crouch where he is happiest: teaching others and preserving traditions.”

Since then, nothing has changed. He and Kay continue to honor that vocation, as best exemplified by the Showcase. Yet, it’s but just a small part of what they do.

In the most recent interview of Patrick and Kay, Patrick shared, about this year’s Showcase, “It’s a real joy for me to be able to play with two former students. It just doesn’t get any better than that.” In addition to Knight, Reath Jackson, who is playing with Hannah Grace, is also a former student. Interestingly, Patrick foreshadowed this enjoyment in that first interview. He said then, “The children … are highly motivated and have good attitudes. That’s a school teacher’s dream really. You can’t beat that. It’s as good as it gets.”

Patrick also pointed to the importance of family support. “I was very fortunate to grow up in a musical family. My kin people on my father’s and mother’s side were musicians. My dad is a guitar player. My parents supported all of my endeavors.” He added, “We’ve always had good community support here.”

Kay added, “One thing I’m just so pleased with is having Caldwell County recognized by the Blue Ridge Music Trails. Knowing that our county is seen as a destination for music lovers is wonderful.” That designation was earned around 2004, noted Kay.

Yet, even though more than 200 musicians with connections to Caldwell County have played in the Showcase during its first 20 years, Kay admits, “One of the things about this year, even though it’s the twenty-first year, it feels validated. The musicians on the stage feel validated. It instills a sense of pride in the county.”

Others might say the same about Kay and Patrick. Back during that first interview, Patrick shared, “I’m very fortunate to have met and married a woman who loves the mountains and natural beauty as I do.” Equally important it would seem – at least for hundreds of musicians, scores of students and thousands of listeners – is that both are talented teachers and determined preservationists of traditional music and Caldwell County’s rich and ongoing contribution to it.

It’s not hard to understand. As I finished my most recent visit with Patrick, we were discussing the role of music in our community. He said simply, “We just keep it positive, Michael. Let’s just keep it positive.”

That’s wise advice. And, why, in my view, musicians and other artists offer the best hope for our future. See for yourself. Watch as your friends and neighbors take the stage and validate not only the Showcase and themselves, but also what they stand for – “Keeping it positive.”

© Michael Mathers Barrick, 2019.

American Roots Music the Focus of ‘From the Hollows to the Honky-Tonks’

Influences, interests and ages of musicians vary; dedication to the craft does not

Note: This article is the third in a series about the 21st Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, coming up on Sat., March 9. Read the first two here. – MMB lenoirvoice@gmail.com

LENOIR, N.C. – The 21st Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – “From the Hollows to the Honky-Tonks,” – will cover the spectrum of Americana music, with the influences, interests and ages of the musicians varying tremendously. What is most significant, however, is what they share in common – an exceptional dedication to the art and craft of writing, playing and singing music.

Founders and hosts of the Showcase, Strictly Clean and Decent, is a local band made up of Kay Crouch, Patrick Crouch, and Ron Shuffler. The Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase has included over 200 local performers throughout its history. Patrick shared, “The goal of the showcase is to promote local live music and increase awareness of live music as an important cultural resource.”

Strictly Clean and Decent will welcome to the stage Blackberry Jam, Will Knight, Home Brewed, Opal Moon, J.J. Hipps, Andy and Gary Trivette, and Hannah Grace. “They will be performing American roots music that is sure to get your toes tapping and your heartstrings stretching,” added Crouch, who provided the following information about the musicians.

Blackberry Jam is a six-piece band sponsored by the Caldwell Arts Council’s Junior Appalachian Musicians (JAM) program. The band, Blackberry JAM, was formed out of the need to provide a performance outlet for talented members of the Caldwell JAM program. Ranging in age from 11 to 18 years, band members are:  brothers Dawson and Lincoln Clark; brother and sister Dalton and Averi Sigmon; Kymdyn Clement; and, Gideon White. Crouch shared, “The band has quickly gained experience performing at a variety of events, festivals, and venues over the past two years. While rooted in the rich musical traditions of our area, the musicians are open to many musical influences. We know you will enjoy Blackberry JAM-The future of tradition.”

Will Knight will be performing on the show as a special guest of Strictly Clean and Decent. Will’s grandparents played country music and his earliest childhood memories are of evenings spent listening to his grandfather playing bass and singing lead while his grandmother played guitar and sang harmony. Will studied piano at an early age and continued his studies with Ron Sinclair at St. Luke’s Methodist Church, Patrick Crouch at Granite Falls Middle School, Arden Carson at South Caldwell High, Rick Cline at Lenoir-Rhyne Percussion, and East Tennessee State University. He studied guitar with Reggie Harris and Andy Page. Will studied dobro with Jaret Carter and is obsessed with the 5-string banjo thanks to Bela Fleck. He worked for six months in the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama in Glasgow, Scotland and has performed in Scotland, England, Wales, and Brazil. We welcome Will back to his hometown stage.

Home Brewed is trio featuring Laura Brewer on bass and vocals, Matt Brewer on guitar and vocals, and Wade Parker on banjo. Matt and Laura began performing in local venues about seven years ago and recently added Wade Parker to the group. Home Brewed performs for private events, 1841 Café, Lenoir Moose Lodge, Fyreside Bottles and Brews, and Granite Falls Brewery. They play a wide variety of music. While they are not a traditional bluegrass band, they put the banjo to rock-n-roll creating a unique sound. Home Brewed plays anything from Led Zeppelin to Patsy Cline, to the Rolling Stones and even Blue Oyster Cult!

Opal Moon is a local musician who plays guitar and sings straight from the heart. She does amazing versions of cover songs and she often performs original music on local songwriter nights. She is steeped in blues, soul, and rock traditions. Opal performs acoustic and electric music. You may hear her performing solo, as a duo with Anthony Pescatore, or with her band Opal Moon and the Dark Sides. She is appearing as a special guest of Strictly Clean and Decent.

J. J. Hipps plays the blues. J.J. performs as a three-piece power trio featuring J.J. on guitar and vocals, the legendary Mark “Bump” Bumgarner on bass, and Ben Pannenbacker on drums. Crouch said, “All you have to do is close your eyes when you hear this music and you will be transported to a different place. It’s a place where the elevation is lower, and the water is higher. It’s a place where they don’t complain about the heat, they call it sultry. But that ain’t all. Through the miracle of modern technology and a Stratocaster guitar, J.J. has not only carries the torch for Delta blues; he takes us to Memphis, Chicago, Muscle Shoals, and Detroit. Yes indeed, Jacob Johnson Hipps plays the blues.”

Andy Trivette is a multi-instrumentalist who has lived in Caldwell County for sixteen years and is a welcome addition to the local music scene. Andy was born in Watauga County the youngest of 11 children, 2 boys and 9 girls, into a very musical family. Andy’s dad played in several bluegrass bands Andy learned to play whatever instruments were laying around; mainly guitar, bass, dobro, and mandolin. Andy has played in several bands over the years most recently he has been playing solo gigs at family venues. Andy will be bringing his telecaster and his brother Gary Trivette will be playing bass as special guests of Strictly Clean and Decent. We are looking forward to hearing these boys “twang it up.”

Hannah Grace is well known in our area. She has amazing stage presence and authentic vocals. The essence of her music cannot be learned, it must be lived. Hannah grew up in our local music scene as part of musical family. Her roots are evident in her sound. She will be performing her brand of country music assisted by David Shumate on guitar, Paul Shumate on drums, Reath Jackson on guitar and vocals, and Randy Matheson on bass.

Nancy Posey will again serve as emcee. Crouch remarked, “Nancy is a high-powered poet, picker, prophet, and preacher who supports live art near and far. We are pleased to have her back!”

Learn More

Patrons of the show may choose to include dinner at 5:30 for an additional $15.  Reservations must be placed in advance. Entrees include a choice of roast pork or NC trout.

Tickets for the showcase are $11 and student and child tickets are available.  To purchase tickets, call the box office at 726-2407 or visit the website of the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

© Michael Mathers Barrick, 2019. Photos of Ron Shuffler and Nancy Posey courtesy photos.

Ambassadors of Traditional Music

Strictly Clean and Decent travels the world in search of songs and singers while staying strongly rooted in Western North Carolina

Note: This submission is the second article in a series about the 21st Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, coming up on Sat., March 9. – MMB lenoirvoice@gmail.com

LENOIR, N.C. – Since 1998, the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase has allowed more than 200 musicians with Caldwell County roots to demonstrate their talents. The 21st Showcase is scheduled for March 9 with this year’s musicians playing tunes that are “From the Hollows to the Honky Tonks” of Caldwell County.

The founders and hosts for the event are Strictly Clean and Decent, an acoustic trio which features Patrick Crouch, Ron Shuffler, and Kay Crouch whose blend of brilliant vocal harmonies tops a solid instrumental foundation. They are dedicated to performing a variety of musical styles in an acoustic setting. Their eclectic repertoire includes modern folk songs by American, Canadian, and Irish songwriters, the fiery breakdowns and songs of family and home found in both traditional and contemporary bluegrass settings, and centuries-old Celtic airs and dance tunes. All of this is peppered with a healthy dose of popular jazz standards, swing and western swing music, and a few classic country tunes thrown in to provide a program certain to be enjoyed by all.

Ron Shuffler plays the upright bass with Strictly Clean and Decent. Ron is a veteran of the early Top 40 and beach music scene but also is well known in country and bluegrass circles. His solid bass playing and impeccable harmony vocals are without equal. Ron was raised in a musical family and his eldest brother, George, virtually created the cross-picking style of guitar playing while working with The Stanley Brothers, a first-generation bluegrass band, in the 1950s and 60s.

Kay Crouch performs on the guitar, flute, piano, and tin whistle with Strictly Clean and Decent.  Kay has a widely varied musical background that includes symphonic and solo percussion work and musical theatre as well as county and bluegrass music. Her interpretive vocals have been an asset to the trio since she joined in 1991.

Patrick Crouch handles the mandolin, banjo, dobro, fiddle, and guitar for the trio. Patrick has been performing acoustic music since 1977 when he founded New River Reign, a staple at Blowing Rock’s P.B. Scott’s Music Hall.  He turned to country music with Long Time Gone and, with Ron Shuffler and Reggie Harris, created Strictly Clean and Decent in 1989. Patrick’s intense, often pyrotechnic but always tasteful, instrumental skills are the highlight of every Strictly Clean and Decent show.

Area reviewers have been unanimous in their acclaim for the trio. The Hickory News claims that “what really sets this trio apart is the bluegrass/swing/pop/country influence of three musicians whose talents take them to virtually every style of music ever conceived!” The Morganton News-Herald states that “the music is quite lively and, while there are many intense selections, the band maintains a jovial rapport with the audience.” Of the trio, Focus says their “on-stage patter is refreshingly self-effacing and laid-back, and the band comes off as extremely likable… Don’t miss this band, because they are a truly unique listening experience.”

Since 1989, Strictly Clean and Decent has performed in Ireland eight times. They have appeared five times on the Cobh International Folk Music and Dance Festival, the Bluegrass and Olde Tyme Music Festival in Cork, and twice at the Irish Bluegrass Music Association’s festival in Athy as well as at venues throughout the country.  However, the trio performs primarily in North Carolina in places as varied as the Biltmore House, Duke Gardens, the NC Museum of Natural History, the NC Arboretum in Asheville, at the Sanford Pottery Festival, and for Winterfest in Blowing Rock. They are regular presenters on the Mountainhome Music Concert series in Boone.  Additionally, they have opened for noted performers such as Doc Watson, Ralph Stanley, J.D. Crowe, Vassar Clements, Tim O’Brien, Tony Rice, Lee Greenwood, John Cowan, Ricky Skaggs, and Jerry Clower.

Strictly Clean and Decent received an Emerging Artist Grant from the Caldwell Arts Council to produce a recording entitled Boomer Breakdown.  Of this project, Bluegrass Unlimited says the group is “precise and well-rehearsed, with a full sound for a trio.”  The trio’s third CD, Crazy Quilt, was released in March of 2003.

Strictly Clean and Decent released their fourth CD, How High the Moon, in 2007.

Since 1998, Strictly Clean and Decent has become active in recording and presenting the great number of traditional musicians in Caldwell County with a long-range goal of recording one hundred musicians in ten years.  To date, with the help of Grassroots Arts Project grants, 128 musicians have been recorded, with backing by the trio, on ten CDs: It Must Be Something in the Water (2001), I Do Re Mi (2002), and Caldwell Roots and Branches (2003), Playin’ Hooky (2004), and Good Ole Boys Like Me (2005), The Lights of Home (2006), Rear View Mirror (2007), A Story to Tell (2008), Winter Star (2009), Fresh Tracks (2010).

Kay, Ron, and Patrick performed Beautiful Star: An Appalachian Nativity with Foothills Performing Arts in December 2014.

Kay, Patrick, and Tom Kuhn toured Germany in July 2015 in conjunction with the Western Piedmont Sister Cities cultural exchange. They performed eighteen concerts in six different Germany cities including Berlin, Munich, Altenburg, Achern, Wernigerode, and Stegen.

Kay and Patrick toured Ireland in October 2015 performing concerts in the towns of Dingle, Cobh, and Cork City. This was Strictly Clean and Decent’s eleventh tour of Ireland.

Strictly Clean and Decent has performed for the International Bluegrass Music Association’s World of Bluegrass Wide Open Street Festival in 2016,2017, and 2018 in conjunction with PineCone-Piedmont Council of Traditional Music.

Strictly Clean and Decent is included in the Touring Artist Directory and The Blue Ridge Music Trails produced by the North Carolina Arts Council.Strictly Clean and Decent may be reached by e-mail at bookings@strictlycleananddecent.com or at (828) 729-0853.

‘From the Hollows to the Honky-Tonks’

The 21st Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase to offer a wide range of musical styles 

Note: This is an article in our new series, “In Tune With.” Through this series, we will feature musicians from Caldwell County and beyond. It is only appropriate that we start the series with the 21st Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, coming up on March 9. Additional articles about the Showcase will follow over the next week. – MMB

By Michael Mathers Barrick lenoirvoice@gmail.com

LENOIR, N.C. – As it enters its third decade, the annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase continues to expand its definition of “traditional” while remaining true to its roots begun 21 years ago.

That’s evident in the title of this year’s Showcase, “From the Hollows to the Honky-Tonks.” And it’s also because the event’s founders and hosts, Kay and Patrick Crouch of Strictly Clean and Decent, are as excited about the Showcase as ever.

It will be presented on Saturday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m. in the J. E. Broyhill Civic Center. Designed to highlight the achievements of local musicians who keep the community’s rich history of traditional music alive, the series has presented more than 200 musicians since 1998. 

Strictly Clean and Decent, a local band whose members include Patrick, Kay, and Ron Shuffler, will host the event as it has each year. According to Patrick, the goal of the showcase is “to increase awareness of live music as an important cultural resource.”

Patrick explained the genesis of this year’s show. He said that as they selected performers for this year’s show, “It just came about that way. The first set is acoustic, the second set electric. Logically, that is what has happened to traditional music.” He explained that the folks that were playing old-timey music in the hollows and back porches of the county’s rolling landscape naturally merged their acoustic playing with electrical instruments and would eventually find themselves playing in bars – honky-tonks.

Lifelong musicians and teachers, Kay and Patrick are also lifelong learners, which is also reflected in this year’s showcase. “The other thing I like about this show is when we called it traditional, I never really thought of it.” By that, he explained that he knew that music is traditional because of its deep roots but hadn’t considered what instruments make it traditional. “It seems it’s the fiddle and banjo,” he said. He noted also that those influences are from two continents. “The fiddle comes from Europe, the banjo from Africa.” He added, “To me, traditional music encompasses all varieties of American music. Rhythm & Blues, Soul, Jazz and Rock & Roll are all American traditional music tied together.”

Kay expanded on Patrick’s insight, saying, “It’s not that every group in the last 20 years has had a fiddle and banjo, but they are traditional musicians in the sense that they’ve been taught in the oral tradition.” She continued, “Many didn’t go to school to study music. They have picked it up from their families, neighbors and other musicians in the community. It’s not for the money.”

The two completed the thought essentially with the same words – “It’s for the enjoyment, for the gathering of friends.”

This year’s enjoyment will be provided by the following gathering of musicians. (Note: Additional articles about the musicians will follow over the next week).

Blackberry Jam is a six-piece band sponsored by the Junior Appalachian Musicians (JAM) program of the Caldwell Arts Council. The band was formed out of the need to provide a performance outlet for advanced students.  It is described as “the future of tradition.” Ranging in age from 11 to 18 years, band members include brothers Dawson and Lincoln Clark, brother and sister Dalton and Averi Sigmon, Kymdyn Clement, and Gideon White.  Blackberry Jam has been featured at many local festivals as well as at the International Bluegrass Music Association conference in Raleigh.

Will Knight studied in the Bluegrass, Old Time, and Country Music Studies program at East Tennessee State University.  He also attended the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama in Glasgow, Scotland and has performed in Scotland, England, and Wales, as well as in Brazil.  Will Knight will perform as a special guest of Strictly Clean and Decent. 

Home Brewed is a trio featuring Laura Brewer on bass, Matt Brewer on guitar, and Wade Parker on banjo.  Its unique sound is best described as countrified rock with a hint of bluegrass as its set list ranges from Patsy Cline to Blue Oyster Cult.

Opal Moon is steeped in blues, soul, and rock traditions.  She regularly performs on local songwriter nights.  Opal Moon will perform as a special guest of Strictly Clean and Decent. 

JJ Hipps is an electric blues band featuring J.J. Hipps on guitar, Mark “Bump” Bumgarner on bass, and Ben Pannenbacker on drums.  Their music covers the entire spectrum of the blues, including styles from the Mississippi Delta, Memphis, Chicago, Muscle Shoals, and Detroit.

Andy Trivette is a multi-instrumentalist who has lived in Caldwell County for sixteen years and is a welcome addition to the local music scene.  He will be joined by his brother Gary Trivette on bass and they will be backed by Strictly Clean and Decent.

Hannah Grace grew up as part of a musical family.  She has created a unique sound that appeals to a wide range of audiences.  She will be performing her brand of country music assisted by David Shumate on guitar, Paul Shumate on drums, Reath Jackson on guitar and vocals, and Randy Matheson on bass.

Nancy Posey returns from Nashville to act as emcee for the showcase.  A poet, blogger, and songwriter, she is a great supporter live music and musicians. A retired English teacher, Patrick says she’s the perfect emcee. “Nancy has immersed herself in the music scene.” He shared that she’s gone to the Swannanoa Gathering and other national and international gatherings of musicians. Patrick continued, “She said, ‘I want to learn to play the mandolin.’ And she did.” He added, in an email, “Nancy is a high powered poet, picker, prophet, and preacher who supports live art near and far.”

Patrons of the show may choose to include dinner at 5:30 for an additional $15.  Reservations must be placed in advance. Entrees include a choice of roast pork or NC trout.

Tickets for the showcase are $11 and student and child tickets are available.  To purchase tickets, call the box office at 726-2407 or visit www.broyhillcenter.com

© Michael Mathers Barrick, 2019.  Photos of Strictly Clean and Decent and Nancy Posey are courtesy photos.




Music along the Hillbilly Highway is ‘Handmade & Heartfelt’

Kay and Patrick Crouch have taught and inspired thousands of students and others in the region; they are also premier promoters of the music of Caldwell County and Southern Appalachia

By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is the sixth installment from “The Hillbilly Highway, Volume 2: Seeds, Songs and Streams.” It is an abridged version of an article originally published in 2017.  Learn more here.

6 Showcase Grand Finale

The Grand Finale of a Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

LENOIR, N.C. – Before we ride the Hillbilly Highway out of Caldwell County for now, our first leg of our tour along the Hillbilly Highway would be incomplete without first acknowledging a couple that have worked tirelessly to preserve and pass along Appalachia’s musical heritage – from Blues to Bluegrass and everything in between.

Handmade & Heartfelt

When I interviewed Kay and Patrick Crouch in 2017, just a few of weeks before the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, they were relaxed – the kind of relaxed that is rooted in two decades of experience – as they discussed preparations for the concert during a visit to their home studio. (The 20th Annual Showcase was held in 2018, and the 21st is already scheduled for March 9, 2019).

Patrick explained the genesis of the theme for 2017, “Handmade & Heartfelt.” He said, “Some years I have the title in my brain and then get the musicians that fit. This year, however, I had this group of people who I love and admire as people and musicians that I’ve been wanting to get on the show. So, it will feature various styles of music – some is original, but all comes from the heart.”

Everybody truly loves music. It is the universal language … .” – Patrick Crouch

The 19th Showcase included eight groups or individuals, including Strictly Clean and Decent, which is Patrick and Kay’s collaboration with Ron Shuffler. The total of musicians performing was about two dozen, in addition to members of the Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Pointing out that 19 years of experience of preparing and hosting the showcase has made it easier for them, Patrick shared, “Now we have a tradition established. I already know what we’re going to do for the 20th.”

Showcase SC&D

Strictly Clean and Decent (Kay Crouch, Patrick Crouch, and Ron Shuffler) host the Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Patrick and Kay acknowledged that not every one of the more than 200 musicians that have appeared in the showcase as of this year are Caldwell County residents, but all have roots to the county. “It’s the traditional music that’s the connection,” offered Kay. She continued, “It’s good to connect with folks from outside Caldwell County. The real value is that these folks see what we’re so proud of.”

Patrick shared, “It is unfathomable to think that more than 200 musicians who live in or have ties to Caldwell County have performed. Our goal was 100. After 10 years, we had reached 128. When we started this, this was our stage that we wanted to share. It is incredible to think about how many musicians we have shared that stage with.” Smiling, and looking at Kay, he added, “It’s just the tip of the iceberg. We have such a community of musicians here. It’s going to just keep growing.”

He continued, “Music flows. It flows from the performer. It’s not something you think about. It’s what we do. The sign of an artist is playing whatever they want.”

Patrick Crouch by David Cortner

Musician Patrick Crouch of Lenoir, N.C. always takes plenty of time to share a story or two about the history and music of Appalachia © David Courtner

That’s exactly what happens at the Showcase. Patrick sends out a schedule to the musicians, tells them how much time they have and how many songs they can play, but does not tell them what to play. He explained why. “Everybody truly loves music. It is the universal language. The audience knows that. The biggest challenge is for the musicians to limit their selections.” He continued, “I don’t give a lot of direction. Early on, we met a lot. Now it’s better to just let things be as they may.”

Besides the quality of musicians that play at the Showcase, Patrick says another reason for its success is how the community of musicians support it. “Those who don’t play in it still come out. Some come during sound check just to see folks they haven’t seen in a while. And, of course, we’ve enjoyed the support of the people of Caldwell County from the beginning.”

Sitting in a room surrounded by CDs, musical memorabilia, instruments and a recording studio, Patrick sat up in his chair and shared, “I stick my chest out when I say I’m from Caldwell County and am talking about our music.”

© Michael M. Barrick, 2017-2018.

 

Still Something in the Water

20th Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase a tribute to its roots

By Michael M. Barrick

LENOIR, N.C. – More than 20 years ago, at a Christmas party at the home of Kay and Patrick Crouch, a typically spontaneous jam session broke out – not unlike the ones that have occurred in homes and on porches in Caldwell County for generations. Present that night was David Briggs, who was then the executive director of the J. E. Broyhill Civic Center.

Recalling that moment recently, Patrick revealed, “He turned to me and said, ‘Patty, why do we not have this on stage?’”

Showcase SC&D

Strictly Clean and Decent (Kay Crouch, Patrick Crouch, and Ron Shuffler, r) are hosting their 20th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

That simple question led to the first annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase at the Civic Center. The show was titled “It Must Be Something in the Water,” a tip to the long, seemingly unending population of musicians living among the hills and hollows of Caldwell County. Now, the 20th Annual Caldwell County Traditional Musicians Showcase is scheduled for March 10, featuring a few of the musicians from that first Showcase and others since, several new performers, and Briggs making an appearance.

“The Showcase was David’s idea,” shared Patrick. “This is a tribute to the original show. This is a tribute to the longevity of the series. I’ll be delighted to have David on stage. Also, Donna Minton, who has helped so much from the beginning.”

Patrick and Kay are teamed up with Ron Shuffler as Strictly Clean and Decent; they will serve as the host band as they have each year since 1998. Also, Roger Hicks and Lyndy Johnson, who performed in the 2001 Showcase, will have a set. “Roger Hicks and Lyndy Johnson are finger-style guitarists who are listed in the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area roster of traditional musicians,” said Patrick.

Patrick also noted that the artwork from the original Showcase was designed by David Courtner, and also expressed deep gratitude to Jeff Bentley, the current executive director of the Civic Center. Bentley, Patrick pointed out, has been there for every show, having been promoted from sound technician to executive director since Briggs left. “We are on solid ground due to the fact that he works hard to promote the show.”

It (the Showcase) has created a greater awareness of music and the folk arts. Folks have embraced that. It’s not only an American music we embrace. It’s Southern music. It’s Southern Appalachian music.” – Patrick Crouch

Despite having familiar faces this year, Patrick said that the fresh faces are just as exciting to him. “It makes me step back and take a reflective look. We have 12 people who have never been in the Showcase. Over 20 years we’ve had more than 200 musicians, and that is just the tip of the iceberg. We have an unlimited supply of talent. That’s beautiful.”

Patrick sang high praises for Conrad Boudreau who is recognized in the Unifour area as a mandolin teacher of young musicians. “He has come into our community with such energy and enthusiasm that he is influencing and encouraging other musicians.” Joining Boudreau will be Minton, whose popularity is evident by the number of times she has performed in the Showcase – in 1998, 2001, and 2007.

A previous performer, Charlie Carpenter (2005) will be joined by first-timer Todd McCloud. “They are known for their unique and powerful duet vocals,” said Patrick.

A couple typically associated with Lenoir’s furniture industry, Alex and Anne Bernhardt will play Cajun music on their first showcase appearance.

Red Rocking Chair, consisting of Jack Lawrence, Tom Kuhn, and Dale Meyer, who have been playing together 12 years, play Bluegrass music, but other genres as well.

Sarah Seymour and Nick Seymour, both of whom performed in 2010 as part of Sweetbriar Jam, will appear as members of Rooted, an acoustic band that plays Americana and roots music in an acoustic setting. Band members with Rooted making their first showcase appearance are Jimmy Atkins, Drew Gray, Seath Gray, and Morgan Smith.

Audience members will be also treated to the excellence of the Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians and the wit of Nancy Posey, taking her third turn as emcee.

Patrick notes that the Showcase is an important contribution to the rich arts tradition of Caldwell County. “It has created a greater awareness of music and the folk arts,” he said. “Folks have embraced that. It’s not only an American music we embrace. It’s Southern music. It’s Southern Appalachian music.

“It makes us a special place.”

The Showcase will be presented on Saturday, March 10, at 7:30 pm at the J. E. Broyhill Civic Center. Tickets may be purchased in advance at the Civic Center or by calling the box office at 828-726-2401.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018.

Caldwell JAM Students, Country Duo Round Out Showcase

Annual event offers rich diversity of talent for music lovers

 By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is another installment in a series about the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – ‘Handmade & Heartfelt.’ A list of previous articles is below. The Showcase is scheduled for Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

JAM 1

JAM Members play for North Carolina’s legislators on ARTS DAY

LENOIR, N.C. – Students learning from the very best of traditional musicians in Caldwell County will be entertaining guests in the stained-glass lobby of the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center as they arrive for the 19th annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase. The students are members of Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians (JAM). Additionally, Blackberry Jam, a small group from Caldwell JAM will play on stage after intermission. It includes Kemdyn Koehler, Avery Sigmon Dalton Sigmon, Jacob Robbins, and Gideon White. Kay Crouch of the host group Strictly Clean and Decent shared, “We welcome these young ‘JAMers’ to the stage.” 

She explained, “JAM is a low-cost, after-school program designed to teach traditional music to children by ear, in order to preserve the oral tradition, and also to give them opportunities to play in both large and small groups.”

According to the Caldwell Arts Council website, “Caldwell JAM … is a program of the Caldwell Arts Council teaching students age 7-17 to play guitar, mandolin, banjo and fiddle with a heavy emphasis on playing traditional and bluegrass music by ear. The classes are taught by some of the region’s most talented artists, many of whom grew up playing old-time or bluegrass. Students also learn about the history of the music, take field trips to music venues, and spend time with musical elders from the community. Caldwell JAM classes are offered at Granite Falls Elementary, Happy Valley K-8, Hudson Elementary, and at in downtown Lenoir in old-time guitar, fiddle, and mandolin.”

JAM at Merlefest

JAM Students at MerleFest 2016

Also sharing the stage will be Lenoir residents Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams, playing country music. According to their Facebook page, Bryan and Williams describe themselves as, “just two guys livin’ out their dreams, pickin’ and singin’ for your entertainment.”  Patrick Crouch offered that the humble description, “ … belies the dedication to their craft which make them two of the most in-demand musicians in Caldwell County. Their unpretentious, ‘what you see is what you get’ sensibility makes them both handmade and heartfelt.”

(Bryant and Williams) are two of the most in-demand musicians in Caldwell County. Their unpretentious, ‘what you see is what you get’ sensibility makes them both handmade and heartfelt.” – Patrick Crouch

In an earlier interview, Crouch explained the genesis of this year’s theme. “Some years I have the title in my brain and then get the musicians that fit. This year, however, I had this group of people who I love and admire as people and musicians that I’ve been wanting to get on the show.  So, it will feature various styles of music – some is original, but all comes from the heart.”

The Showcase is scheduled for tomorrow, Saturday, March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center. Purchase tickets here from the Civic Center.

The Lenoir Voice, 2017. 

The Lenoir voice on Facebook

On Twitter: @lenoirvoice

Previous 2017 Showcase Articles

Handmade & Heartfelt: Theme of 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase inspired by area musicians

Jimmie Griffith Exemplifies Showcase Theme: Music is handmade in Caldwell County and is heartfelt from his native Brazil

Nancy Posey Bringing Her Humor and Wit to Showcase: Calls her role as emcee a mere ‘footnote’ to the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition: Boone-based group brings energy, excellence and creativity to Showcase

Sycamore Bones Just Keeps Creating: Lenoir-based trio bringing their own brand of music to annual Caldwell Showcase

Just Don’t Throw Tomatoes: Max Waters personifies talent, humility and humor that makes the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase a success

Ridgeline Brings ‘High Lonesome Sound’ to Showcase: Influenced by bluegrass greats, Ridgeline plays a hard-driving style

Showcase Performers

This year’s concert will include eight groups or individuals. The total of musicians performing will be around two dozen, in addition to JAM members.

Strictly Clean and Decent with Kay and Patrick Crouch and Ron Shuffler.

showcase-scd-2

Strictly Clean & Decent

Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Ridgeline: A bluegrass band featuring Jim Matheson on guitar, Mike Nelson on banjo, Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Larry Wright on bass, and Jimmy Houston on guitar.

MaisCeu featuring multi-instrumentalist Jimmie Griffith performing Brazilian music.

Max Waters playing Southern gospel, jazz, and blues piano.

Strictly Strings performing old time and contemporary string band music.  The band is Kathleen Burnett on fiddle and guitar, Anissa Burnett on bass and fiddle, Willow Dillon on banjo, fiddle, bass, and cello, Caleb Coatney on mandolin, banjo, and guitar, and Cecil Gurganus on guitar, fiddle, and bass.

Sycamore Bones with Cory Kinal, Andrew Massey, and Abigail Taylor performing original music.

Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams performing country music.

Nancy Posey will be emcee.

 

Ridgeline Brings ‘High Lonesome Sound’ to Showcase

Influenced by bluegrass greats, Ridgeline plays a hard-driving style

By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is another installment in a series about the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – ‘Handmade & Heartfelt.’ A list of previous articles is below. The Showcase is scheduled for Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

Live Music

LENOIR, N.C. – Just like so many of the musicians that perform in the annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, many of the members of the bluegrass band Ridgeline hold down other jobs that help pay the bills. That does not mean, however, they don’t entertain with enthusiasm and excellence; in fact, it is the passion for the music despite often having to work other jobs – that “handmade and heartfelt” approach to creating it – that has been a primary reason why the Showcase is completing its 19th straight year as an annual event in Lenoir.

Ridgeline features Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Mike Nelson on banjo, Larry Wright on bass, Jim Matheson on guitar, and Jimmy Houston on guitar. Also joining them for the Showcase will be David Parker on mandolin. Kay Crouch, of host group Strictly Clean and Decent, has written this of Ridgeline in her program notes: “The band plays hard-driving bluegrass and bluegrass gospel music that is representative of the ‘high, lonesome sound.’ She added, “Their heartfelt delivery is the cornerstone of every Ridgeline performance.”

They’re just a great group of folks that make up the group Ridgeline. I’m very pleased with the team I’ve got together.” – Tim Greene

Greene expressed delight at the current Ridgeline lineup. “We have a great group of musicians with us. Most of us also manage careers as well. April, for example, is a professor at Appalachian State University. They’re just a great group of folks that make up the group Ridgeline. I’m very pleased with the team I’ve got together.”

He added, “I’ve been playing 23 years professionally. This is the lineup we’ve had for two years and I am very much pleased. The original band was Carolina Harvest. Two of the original members have passed on, so we changed the group’s name. Those folks were Clarence Greene and Doug Greene.”

nancy-posey-on-mandolin-david-courtner

Nancy Posey playing the mandolin. She will serve as emcee for the Showcase. Photo by David Courtner.

Greene has a long history in the genre, traveling here and yonder to play. “I used to travel. I played with the James King Band. I played with David Parmley and Continental Divide. There are so many to mention.”

While he does write music, Greene shared, “We will play some original music, and we do a lot of cover tunes right now.” He revealed, “We are in the process of writing and a recording our own CD. It’s taking time but we want to get it right. We want people to enjoy it. We want to be happy with it.”

I saw Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver when I was young. It was the original band. That experience told me right there what I wanted to do.” – Tim Greene

Ridgeline draws from a long line of famous bluegrass musicians. Greene shared that Nelson’s banjo playing is influenced by the legendary Earl Scruggs. The group is also influenced by the work of J. D. Crow. Greene recalled, “I saw Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver when I was young. It was the original band. That experience told me right there what I wanted to do.” He was also influenced by the Osmond Brothers. “There harmony is so pure, which is essential to bluegrass.” He continued, “April likes the old traditional music as well. She’s kind of in to some folk music as well. My step-dad and his daddy played the fiddle. They played a lot with Doc Watson when he was growing up.” He added, “Larry is steeped in the music of IIIrd Tyme Out, Ralph Stanley, Lou Reid and Carolina, and The Country Gentlemen. They influence us all. They were bluegrass icons. We look up to those guys.”

As a result, Greene is hopeful that those influences – familiar also to much of the audience – will resonate with those in the seats. “We want the audience to experience good wholesome music. We want them to enjoy themselves. We enjoy ourselves as we perform. When they come to a Ridgeline show, I want them to be pleased with the music and the show we put on. We don’t want to come off as better than anyone else. We just want to get out there and do the best we can for the folks.”

showcase-grand-finale

The grand finale from a previous Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Greene expressed joy at the opportunity to play in the Showcase. “I was born and raised here in Caldwell County. Larry and Mike were born and raised here. It’s a big deal for us, especially for me because I’ve played the music so long as I’ve traveled the United States and Canada over and over. I finally get to play in front of the hometown crowd. It’s a real honor. The others feel the same way. We’re all proud to play in front of the home town folks. It’s the first time for all of us.”

He concluded, “Patrick and Kay and I have been friends for a long time. I’m thankful Patrick asked us to be part of it. It’s going to be good. I hope we have a big crowd. It’s going to be fun.”

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017. 

The Lenoir voice on Facebook

On Twitter: @lenoirvoice

Previous 2017 Showcase Articles

Handmade & Heartfelt: Theme of 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase inspired by area musicians

Jimmie Griffith Exemplifies Showcase Theme: Music is handmade in Caldwell County and is heartfelt from his native Brazil

Nancy Posey Bringing Her Humor and Wit to Showcase: Calls her role as emcee a mere ‘footnote’ to the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition: Boone-based group brings energy, excellence and creativity to Showcase

Sycamore Bones Just Keeps Creating: Lenoir-based trio bringing their own brand of music to annual Caldwell Showcase

Sycamore Bones vertical

Sycamore Bones on stage. From left, Abigail Taylor, Cory Kinal and Andrew Massey.

Just Don’t Throw Tomatoes: Max Waters personifies talent, humility and humor that makes the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase a success 

Showcase Information and Performers

The 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase will be on Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center. Purchase tickets here from the Civic Center. 

This year’s concert will include eight groups or individuals. The total of musicians performing will be around two dozen, in addition to JAM members.

Strictly Clean and Decent with Kay and Patrick Crouch and Ron Shuffler.

Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Ridgeline: A bluegrass band featuring Jim Matheson on guitar, Mike Nelson on banjo, Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Larry Wright on bass, and Jimmy Houston on guitar.

MaisCeu featuring multi-instrumentalist Jimmie Griffith performing Brazilian music.

Max Waters playing Southern gospel, jazz, and blues piano.

Strictly Strings performing old time and contemporary string band music.  The band is Kathleen Burnett on fiddle and guitar, Anissa Burnett on bass and fiddle, Willow Dillon on banjo, fiddle, bass, and cello, Caleb Coatney on mandolin, banjo, and guitar, and Cecil Gurganus on guitar, fiddle, and bass.

Sycamore Bones with Cory Kinal, Andrew Massey, and Abigail Taylor performing original music.

Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams performing country music.

Nancy Posey will be emcee.

 

Just Don’t Throw Tomatoes

Max Waters personifies talent, humility and humor that makes the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase a success 

By Michael M. Barrick

Note: This is another installment in a series about the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase – ‘Handmade & Heartfelt.’ A list of previous articles is below. The Showcase is scheduled for Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center.

Showcase Handmade & Heartfelt logo

LENOIR, N.C. – In addition to “Handmade & Heartfelt” for themes for this year’s Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase, perhaps humility and humor should be added also. That is because that is what Max Waters, who plays traditional southern gospel music, brings to the Showcase.

He also brings a ton of talent, 50 years of experience, and the respect of his peers.

Yet, when asked what he hopes the audience will experience from his performance at the Showcase, Waters said, “Well, it would be nice if no one threw tomatoes.”

I just hope the audience has half the fun listening as I expect to have playing.” – Max Waters

He added, “Other than that, I don’t think the couple of numbers I’ll be doing will be a life-changing experience for anyone. Getting to play along with Strictly Clean and Decent will be a great experience and I just hope the audience has half the fun listening as I expect to have playing.”

If longevity is any indication, his set will be a hit. He explained, “Herb Miller, who was a member of the first quartet in which Lenoir native George Younce sang, introduced me to traditional southern gospel music when I was an 18-year-old boy. I’ve spent the past 50 years accompanying groups and singers in that particular genre.”

Kay Crouch, of host group Strictly Clean and Decent, has written this of Waters in her program notes: “Max is the consummate southern gospel pianist. He has a long history with Strictly Clean and Decent, having performed with Patrick’s uncle Cole Crouch in The Messengers, and with Ron’s brother George Shuffler in The Shuffler Family Band, as well as with many others. His playing is heavily influenced by many genres outside of gospel music but it is his joy and contagious enthusiasm that delight his audiences and colleagues alike.”

Max is the consummate artist who plays his instrument flawlessly and totally understands ensemble playing. Max’s joy and enthusiasm is more than contagious. It is a pure delight to share the stage with him.” – Patrick Crouch

Patrick Crouch added, “My Uncle Cole Crouch played music with Max many years ago in the Messengers Gospel group. He talked endlessly about Max’s musical knowledge and his mastery of the piano. Uncle Cole loved Max for his music and for his attitude toward fellow musicians. I had the pleasure of playing music with Max a few years ago and experienced everything my uncle had told me. Max is the consummate artist who plays his instrument flawlessly and totally understands ensemble playing. Max’s joy and enthusiasm is more than contagious. It is a pure delight to share the stage with him.”

Explaining why he enjoys gospel music, Waters explained, “Every song turns out to be a mini message in a powerful format. Some people will come listen to gospel music that would never put their foot in a church door. Gospel has the essence of blues, country and some traditional music. It’s not the same every time. And for me anyway, it is forever challenging.”

He explained, “I do like to do my own arranging, keeping the recognized melody in place but adjusting the harmony (re-harmonization) seems to freshen-up the old familiar hymns.”

Max Waters on piano

Max Waters

Playing in the Showcase is meaningful for Waters for a number of reasons. He explained, “I was born in the Kings Creek community of Caldwell County in 1948 and today live in the Kings Creek community not a quarter mile from where I was raised. Having traveled around the world numerous times I can say without hesitation that, as far as I am concerned, no place compares with the quality of life we experience in this part of God’s green earth.”

He continued, “The Showcase is special to me because it gives me the opportunity to play along with Patrick of Strictly Clean and Decent, whose uncle Cole Crouch was my musical mentor. Cole passed away some time ago, but make no mistake about it – the man was a musical genius whose guitar work was among the best in the business.”

He concluded, “I just appreciate the opportunity to play with Strictly Clean and Decent. I have traveled all over. It is quite a pleasant experience to play again with Patrick. It’s going to be a whole lot of fun.” 

© The Lenoir Voice, 2017. 

The Lenoir voice on Facebook

On Twitter: @lenoirvoice

Previous 2017 Showcase Articles

Handmade & Heartfelt: Theme of 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase inspired by area musicians

Jimmie Griffith Exemplifies Showcase Theme: Music is handmade in Caldwell County and is heartfelt from his native Brazil

Nancy Posey Bringing Her Humor and Wit to Showcase: Calls her role as emcee a mere ‘footnote’ to the Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase

Strictly Strings Carrying on the Old-Time Tradition: Boone-based group brings energy, excellence and creativity to Showcase

Sycamore Bones Just Keeps Creating: Lenoir-based trio bringing their own brand of music to annual Caldwell Showcase

Showcase Information and Performers

The 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase will be on Sat., March 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center. Purchase tickets here from the Civic Center. 

This year’s concert will include eight groups or individuals. The total of musicians performing will be around two dozen, in addition to JAM members.

Strictly Clean and Decent with Kay and Patrick Crouch and Ron Shuffler.

Caldwell Junior Appalachian Musicians performing traditional string music.

Ridgeline: A bluegrass band featuring Jim Matheson on guitar, Mike Nelson on banjo, Tim Greene on mandolin and guitar, April Flanders on fiddle, Larry Wright on bass, and Jimmy Houston on guitar.

MaisCeu featuring multi-instrumentalist Jimmie Griffith performing Brazilian music.

Max Waters playing Southern gospel, jazz, and blues piano.

Strictly Strings performing old time and contemporary string band music.  The band is Kathleen Burnett on fiddle and guitar, Anissa Burnett on bass and fiddle, Willow Dillon on banjo, fiddle, bass, and cello, Caleb Coatney on mandolin, banjo, and guitar, and Cecil Gurganus on guitar, fiddle, and bass.

strictly-strings-4

Strictly Strings as seen on the cover of their album, ‘High on a Mountain.’ Photo by Martin Church.

Sycamore Bones with Cory Kinal, Andrew Massey, and Abigail Taylor performing original music.

Darren Bryant and Justin Clyde Williams performing country music.

Nancy Posey will be emcee.