Tag Archives: Western North Carolina

First Bands of Rain from Florence Arrive Softly in WNC

Deceptively gentle rain, light wind gusts first indicators of monster storm

By Michael M. Barrick

LENOIR, N.C. – The first bands of rain from Tropical Storm Florence began dropping gentle rain and rustling trees with light wind gusts shortly after noon here today.

Still, forecasters at Ray’s Weather Center point out that the likelihood of heavy rain tonight and tomorrow along with life-threatening flash flooding remains. Rainfall amounts could range from 2 to 10 inches, with areas south and east of the Blue Ridge Escarpment most at risk. This includes the northern half of Caldwell County.

Today, however, felt much like a spring rain, so I got out to take a few photos during the “calm before the storm.”

Do not be deceived though. Take all of the precautions that emergency preparedness officials issue. Remember, “It’s not nice to fool with Mother Nature.”

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018.

Flower

Flowers at the J.E. Broyhill Walking park soak up the first raindrops from Florence

Ducks

The ducks found the park pretty much to themselves

Hibriten Mtn

Clouds swirl around Hibriten Mountain

Walking park lake

Gentle rain falls on the lake at J.E. Broyhill Walking park

 

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Towering Mountains and Church Steeples along the Hillbilly Highway

The Grandfather of mountains affords mile-high stunning views

 Note: This is the second installment from “The Hillbilly Highway, Volume 2: Seeds, Songs and Streams.”  Learn more here. 

By Michael M. Barrick

2 Grandfather Mtn bridge and steeple

FOSCOE, N.C. – Towering mountains and church steeples are common sites in Appalachia. Not so common are swinging bridges that are a mile high. But there it is on the far left – The Mile-High Swinging Bridge on Grandfather Mountain in North Carolina. Seen here from N.C. Rt. 105 in Watauga County, the bridge was built in 1952 and renovated in 1999.

Winds of more than 100 miles an hour and temperatures below zero have been recorded there. Not far further up the road, one can see the famous “profile view” that gives the mountain its name – the appearance of a Grandpa – beard and all, reclining. Its peak is the intersection of Avery, Caldwell and Watauga counties. Indeed, Caldwell County, where we live, has the greatest rise in elevation among the state’s 100 counties, from roughly 1,000 feet to just under 6,000 feet. Its peak is the banner on The Lenoir Voice. 

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018

 

Andrew Massey Living Lenoir’s Legacy

Pickin’ and playing on the porch as old as this Western North Carolina county

Note: This is the first installment in “The Hillbilly Highway, Volume 2: Seeds, Songs and Streams.” I’m beginning as about to close as home as I can get – a neighbor of our daughter. Caldwell County is full of fascinating people and wondrous beauty, so many of our first installments will be from here, but I’m working my way up to at least the Mason-Dixon line over the next few weeks and months. Learn more here.

By Michel M. Barrick

Andrew Massey 1

LENOIR, N.C. – Since the first European pioneers explored the Yadkin Valley and settled Tucker’s Barn – our modern day Lenoir – music has been central to our heritage.

Above, my buddy Andrew Massey takes a few minutes to pick on his guitar on his back deck. Constantly writing, he played two new tunes. Pickin’ and singing on your porch is nothing new in Lenoir or anywhere in Caldwell County. It’s a way of life. Musicians thrive off of each other and the heritage is continued!

It’s always a joy to enjoy the creative offerings of Andrew and his many friends. Indeed, he is part of Sycamore Bones, a local band that plays regionally and played an electrifying set in the 19th Annual Caldwell Traditional Musicians Showcase.

visitlenoirOne thing I concluded for certain from listening to Andrew offer his latest creations on an unseasonably warm and beautifully sunny February afternoon – the arts community truly is the shining light of Lenoir. Lenoir, in turn, continues to play a vital role in the preservation of traditional Appalachian music. It is a must stop along the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area. If interested, learn more here.

© Michael M. Barrick, 2018.